Monthly Archives: July 2016

Prostate cancer news: Laser ablation becomes viable treatment option

Prostate cancer news: Laser ablation becomes viable treatment option Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation – the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor – is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer. The Phase 1 study found no serious adverse effects or changes in urinary or sexual function six months after the procedure. The technique uses magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to guide the insertion of a laser fiber into cancerous tumors. When heated, the laser destroys the cancerous tissue. A follow-up study, presented in a poster presentation at the American Urology Association meeting in May, showed the potential to transfer [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:22+00:00 July 14th, 2016|

Prostate cancer news: Laser ablation becomes viable treatment

Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation – the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor – is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer. The Phase 1 study found no serious adverse effects or changes in urinary or sexual function six months after the procedure. The technique uses magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to guide the insertion of a laser fiber into cancerous tumors. When heated, the laser destroys the cancerous tissue. A follow-up study, presented in a poster presentation at the American Urology Association meeting in May, showed the potential to transfer this treatment for the first time into a clinic [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:22+00:00 July 12th, 2016|

Obesity and a high-fat diet promote prostate cancer progression

Metabolites from a fatty diet join forces with the cancer-driving gene MYC to reprogram prostate cancer cells to grow faster, finds new study. This discovery solidifies a direct link between obesity and lethal prostate cancer. At the 2016 Annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Conference, Giorgia Zadra, PhD, of the Harvard: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, presented results from a study that helped to clarify the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer. The skinny? Fat increases the activity of a critical cancer-driving gene called MYC. Cancer is a greedy disease. Tumors plunder the body's resources - vitamins and nutrients, energy and oxygen, and vital space as tumors grow to ultimately cause lethal damage. Worst of all, cancer steals precious time away [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:22+00:00 July 5th, 2016|