Monthly Archives: November 2016

One year following FDA approval California HIFU is Giving Prostate Cancer Patients Hope for a Healthy Future

Santa Rosa Urologist Dr. Michael Lazar celebrates California HIFU’s first anniversary with look back at October 2015 when HIFU received approval from Food and Drug Administration for use in the U.S. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technology that targets cancer cells with precision in a one to four-hour procedure that has little or no side effects, provides a remarkably quick recovery rate, and gives men diagnosed with prostate cancer a less invasive option over surgery or radiation. “The oncological results for HIFU is comparable to more traditional prostate cancer treatments including radical surgery or radiation. But the side effects for HIFU patients have proven to be much less debilitating than more radical procedures,” says Dr. Lazar. “For example, if the HIFU procedure is performed [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:21+00:00 November 22nd, 2016|

Researchers Find that blood samples may help predict prostate cancer spread

Researchers have found a group of circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer patient blood samples which are linked to the spread of the disease, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool. This is the first time these cell types have been shown to be a promising marker for prostate cancer spread. In a study of around 80 samples from men with prostate cancer, scientists at the Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University looked for cells that were gaining the ability to migrate and invade through the body. Samples with more of these cells were more likely to come from patients whose cancer had spread or was more aggressive. This means that, in the future, these [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:21+00:00 November 15th, 2016|

Researchers discover three novel intrinsic subtypes of prostate cancer

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Findings represent a step toward the implementation of personalized medicine in prostate cancer care. To diagnose and determine treatment for prostate cancer, clinicians consider many factors, including a digital rectal exam, the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level in a patient's blood and prostate tumor biopsy results. Molecular subtyping of tumor cells allows oncologists to individualize care and tailor treatment based on the actual biology of each patient's [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:21+00:00 November 1st, 2016|