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Monthly Archives: December 2016

Sonablate HIFU Tissue Change Monitoring

HIFU, which stands for high intensity focused ultrasound is a recently approved new technology for prostate tissue ablation. Many urologists have worked with HIFU for several years to offer their patients a minimally invasive treatment option for prostate cancer, either as a part of a clinical trial or at international treatment centers outside the United States.

There are currently two different medical devices that use HIFU energy to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate. The most technologically advanced HIFU device for prostate cancer is called the Sonablate. The Sonablate is a software directed device that includes a computer console, a transrectal probe and a chilling unit. The Sonablate software that physicians use to plan and execute Sonablate HIFU treatment has state-of-the-art features that make it the safest and most precise HIFU device for prostate disease available.

Using the Sonablate state-of-the-art software physicians obtain real-time images of the prostate that are used to map out and target exactly where HIFU should be delivered. Once treatment plan is mapped, HIFU energy is delivered to those areas.

One of the unique key features that the Sonablate has is called Tissue Change Monitoring, or more simply, TCM.

What is TCM?

The most simple way to explain it is that TCM allows the treating HIFU doctor to monitor changes that happen to the tissue in the prostate after the HIFU energy has been delivered. This monitoring of tissue is important because the doctor will immediately know if enough energy has been delivered to effectively destroy the tissue.

While HIFU is being delivered to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate, physicians have the ability to monitor how the tissue is changing and reacting. The Sonablate gives unique feedback on changes to the tissue so the doctor can monitor exactly what is happening and make adjustments as needed for the best outcomes.

Read the full story here …

High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. Visit our website to learn More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 20th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New study suggests a more accurate system for early detection, treatment of prostate cancer

A new study may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.


New research coauthored by Brigham Young University researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer.

The new study, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details a computer model that uses medical images to reproduce the growth patterns of prostate cancer on the anatomy of a patient’s prostate.

This type of mathematical modeling and simulation of disease (aka predictive medicine) can lead to personalized treatment and more accurate forecasting of clinical outcomes.

“There is a lot of room for improvement in both the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer,” said study coauthor Michael Scott, BYU professor of civil and environmental engineering. “We’re using computer modeling to capture the behavior of prostate tumor growth which will hopefully lead to minimally invasive predictive procedures which can be used in clinical practice.”

Current diagnosis methods include invasive biopsy procedures which too often lead to patients being over-treated or under-treated. Complicating matters is the fact that prostate cancer can remain undiagnosed because early stages of the disease may not produce symptoms until a tumor is either very large or has invaded other tissues.

The new system could lead to both earlier diagnosis and less invasive testing. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.

Scott, and fellow BYU professor Kevin Tew teamed up with colleagues at the University of Coruna, UT-Austin and Carnegie Mellon for the study. The personalized tumor growth simulations leveraged the high-performance computing resources available through BYU’s Fulton Supercomputing Lab.

Scott said the research is still in its infancy and extensive validation and refinement of the model must occur before it is ready for clinical application. That said, “it’s likely that these types of models will eventually turn up in medical practice,” he added.

“We are entering an age where we will see the emergence of tools which leverage computation to improve diagnosis of disease,” Scott said. “And we’re not the only people working in this area — it’s rapidly growing.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by Brigham Young University. Original written by Todd Hollingshead. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Read on ScienceDaily: Brigham Young University. “Computer modeling could lead to new method for detecting, managing prostate cancer.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161122080748.htm.


High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. HIFU is most effective for patients with early stage prostate cancer where the cancer is localized to the prostate. Visit our website to learn more: http://www.californiahifu.com/ #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 6th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments