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Monthly Archives: January 2017

Free HIFU Info Session Scheduled for February

Do you have prostate cancer?

There is now a non-invasive treatment option.

Join Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU for a special Prostate Cancer Treatment Information session scheduled for Thurs., Feb. 16, 2017 at 7 p.m. This free session will be held at the Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95405. Dr. Lazar will discuss how Sonablate HIFU can treat Prostate Cancer with lower risk of side effects such as impotence and incontinence. HIFU is radiation free – provides quick recovery – requires no chemotherapy and no surgery.

Free and open to the public. Call for reservations today Jennifer Radovich 707-546-5553.

Refreshments will be provided.

Brought to you by HIFU Prostate Services and California HIFU.

By | January 31st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Prostate Cancer Rates Take a Nose Dive Per Latest Statistics

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU, Urologist and Prostate Cancer expert reflects on the latest American Cancer Society statics

The results from the American Cancer Society’s newest report on cancer rates is good news for everyone and particularly good news for prostate cancer patients: incidents of cancer is down as is the likelihood of prostate cancer patients dying from the diagnosis.

According to the report the cancer death rate has dropped from its peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 161.2 in 2014 (per 100K population), the most recent year for which data was available to analyze. Overall the decline in cancer is linked with decreases in smoking and advances in early detection and treatment. The four major cancer drops are:

  • lung (- 43% between 1990 and 2014 among males and -17% between 2002 and 2014 among females)
  • breast (-38% from 1989 to 2014)
  • prostate (-51% from 1993 to 2014)
  • colorectal (-51% from 1976 to 2014)

“This is really exciting news for anyone who specializes in prostate cancer,” says Michael Lazar, M.D. “And its particularly good news for our patients. When a man is diagnosed with cancer, whether it’s prostate cancer or some other cancer – the news is always difficult to accept. With the number of people being diagnosed with prostate cancer dropping steadily along with the expected death rates, patients are now more empowered to be optimistic about their treatment options.”

According to the American Cancer Society, the decline in new cancer rates for men can be attributed to the recent drop in prostate cancer diagnoses. This has to do with the fact that routine screening with the PSA blood test is no longer recommended out of concerns for over-diagnosis and treatment of positive results that are best left untreated. Therefore, fewer cases of prostate cancer are now being detected. But this does not need to lessen the importance of getting screened for prostate cancer when symptoms are apparent.

“Although this is really good news, men who are concerned about prostate cancer, and anyone in the high-risk group still needs to be to screened early and at regular intervals,” says Dr. Lazar. “Once cancer has advanced beyond the prostate gland, available treatment options become more radical.”

The highest risk groups for prostate cancer are men over the age of 50, African-American men, and men who have a father, brother or son who has had prostate cancer.

About Prostate Cancer

Most prostate cancers tend to grow slowly, and don’t cause obvious health problems for men who have received a diagnosis. In certain situations, prostate cancer can be managed conservatively, especially in elderly men. But one treatment that stands out among more invasive options for prostate cancer is High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and it is most effective for men who have been diagnose and are in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, this is one technology that requires vigilance at the early stages when HIFU would be most effective for prostate cancer eradication.

“For patients with prostate cancer, HIFU treatment is most effective in the early stages,” explains Dr. Lazar. “When the cancer is localized to the prostate treatment by HIFU is extremely effective. Unlike other treatments, this procedure preserves healthy tissue and nerves, so urine flow and erectile function is maintained in a high percent of cases, as compared to radical surgery or radiation.”

The oncological results for HIFU is comparable to more traditional prostate cancer treatments including radical surgery or radiation. But the side effects for HIFU patients have proven to be much less debilitating than more radical procedures.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar formed California HIFU to offer minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment to men with the Sonablate.

For more information about HIFU treatment which is now available in San Francisco, or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553. Visit us online to learn more.

 

Researchers unravel genetic codes to determine why inherited prostate cancer is so deadly

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

Canadian and Australian prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

The findings, published online in Nature Communications, show that BRCA2-associated tumours are already pre-set to be aggressive, even before treatment. This is because the genes normally involved in regulating cell growth and division are abnormal in the BRCA2-associated cancers right from the get-go and therefore are resistant to therapy right up front, says co-principal investigator Dr. Robert Bristow, clinician-scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. In the Nature Communications study, Dr. Bristow and co-principal investigators Dr. Paul Boutros at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and Prof.

Gail Risbridger at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, compared 15 patients with BRCA2-inherited prostate cancer with 500 prostate cancer patients from the general population with non-inherited (“sporadic”) prostate cancer. In the related study of 500 tumours from Canadian men with non-inherited prostate cancer also published in Nature, Drs. Bristow and Boutros analyses led to the discovery of a new genetic fingerprint that identifies when curable disease may turn aggressive.Although BRCA2-inherited disease affects less than 2 per cent of men with prostate cancer, Dr. Bristow says the research sets the stage to rethink ways to use other drugs differently to personalize treatment for more men.

“The pathways that we discovered to be abnormal in the localized BRCA2-associated cancers are usually only found in general population cancers when they become resistant to hormone therapy and spread through the body,” says Dr. Bristow. “These include pathways related to the repair of DNA damage, cell division, the receptor for the male hormone testosterone and cell-to-cell signaling. “We now know need to explore the use of novel therapies to offset the BRCA2-associated aggressiveness earlier on in the treatment of these men and improve survival in an otherwise lethal tumour,” he says. “This might include different types of chemotherapy or the use of molecular-targeted drugs that specifically target the changes associated with BRCA2 mutation.”

“This is an exciting time in prostate cancer research in which the genetics of individual men and their cancers are beginning to dictate precise and customized treatment,” he adds. “It is an example of the power of international collaboration and team science to crack the genetic code even in the rarest of tumours.”

See this story on Science Daily: 9 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170109125240.htm
Story Source: Materials provided by University Health Network (UHN). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
By | January 10th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New research reveals evidence linking inflammation to increased prostate cancer risk

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU discusses the latest research on prostate cancer which offers hope for future treatments and may help to prevent the disease from becoming aggressive.

An interesting new study, conducted by Dr. Andrew Goldstein, an assistant professor of molecular biology and a team of UCLA researchers, highlights a previously unrecognized type of cell that is found in uncommonly high numbers in inflamed areas of the prostate gland. These cells are now thought to initiate prostate cancer in response to genetic mutations.

The study results suggest inflammation increases overall risk for the disease by increasing the available number of affected cells that can develop into prostate cancer. “The findings from research such as this will hopefully lead to the development of better treatments for prostate cancer and prostatitis and offer new screening methods for the diseases associated with the prostate gland,” explains Dr. Michael Lazar, director of California HIFU.

Background on the research

Scientists have known that one of the risk factors for aggressive prostate cancer is chronic inflammation of the prostate (a process whereby cells from the immune system migrate to the prostate gland), but exactly how that process unfolds has been somewhat of a mystery.

Although prostate cancer itself is more common in older men, prostatitis – or inflammation of the prostate gland – can strike at any age. Statistics suggest that as many as one in every six men have this condition at some stage during their lives.

Prostate Inflammation vs. prostatitis

Prostate disease accompanied by inflammation is any medical problem that affects the prostate gland and can include;

  • benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • prostatitis
  • prostate cancer

Inflammation of the prostate gland or ‘prostatitis’ is commonly accompanied by symptoms of soreness and irritation of the prostate gland. It is accompanied by frequent, sometimes painful urination and lower back pain that can eventually lead to fever, chills and muscle pain – hallmarks of bacterial infection.

Prostatitis can be caused by both a bacterial infection (acute) and non-bacterial inflammation (chronic). But no matter which aspect of the disease a man has, it can be very painful and have a negative effect on quality of life. The new research suggests that inflammation of the prostate such as occurs in prostatitis can lead to prostate cancer in predictable ways.

Research details

UCLA-led research has previously shown that two different types of cells, known as basal and luminal, represented potential precursors to prostate cancer. Further research by colleagues at Johns Hopkins Medical Center observed that prostate cells in the proximity of inflammation appeared different under the microscope and expressed different genes, leading to the hypothesis that these types of cells were more likely to multiply than are normal prostate cells not under stress by inflammation.

Under the new study the UCLA team discovered that cells originating from areas with inflammation are indeed the more aggressive cells known to initiate tumors, validating the earlier hypothesis and expanding on the possibility for more research, and potentially better treatment options.

“With this new research urologists now have the opportunity to look at the importance of managing symptoms of inflammation early,” says Dr. Lazar. “Better management of the inflammation could very well lead to prostate cancer prevention. Continuing research on the subject will likely help to direct better treatments as new study results are revealed.”

About California HIFU and Dr. Lazar

HIFU is a FDA approved precise and targeted therapy that reduces the risk of complications caused by surgery and radiation. HIFU uses ultrasound energy, or sound waves, to heat and destroy specifically targeted areas of tissue. HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease.

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use HIFU for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar formed California HIFU in order to offer minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment to men with the Sonablate. For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553 or visit our website: www.californiahifu.com.

By | January 3rd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments