cancer news

COVID-19 Information for Prostate Cancer Patients

Many who have been affected by prostate cancer, or whose loved ones have been affected by prostate cancer, might be wondering if special precautions need to be taken with the coronavirus pandemic unfolding. We have always believed that evidence out of science and research are the best tools for solving patients’ problems, whether that’s cancer or public health emergencies. As such, we will do our best to use science to provide information and a steady hand in this tumultuous situation. Scientists know that the coronavirus (aka COVID-19 COrona VIrus Disease 2019) can affect your immune system, although we are still learning more. Based on recent data as reported in the journal The Lancet, it appears that the virus hits the immune system early [...]

2020-03-24T09:30:41-07:00March 24th, 2020|

Pilot study repurposes antidepressant to fight prostate cancer

An antidepressant in use for decades, repurposed to fight prostate cancer, shows promise in helping patients whose disease has returned following surgery or radiation, a pilot study at USC shows. The drug -- an MAO inhibitor called phenelzine -- represents a potential new treatment direction with fewer side effects for men with recurrent prostate cancer, researchers said. "To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial of an MAO inhibitor in cancer patients," said senior author Jean Shih, a University Professor in USC's School of Pharmacy who has studied the enzyme MAO, or monoamine oxidase, for four decades. The research appears in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. "If our findings are confirmed, this could be part of a new avenue [...]

2020-03-10T12:53:09-07:00March 10th, 2020|

Understanding when to start prostate cancer screening

According to the latest research on prostate cancer prevention, it's important to be proactive and consult with a doctor to establish a prostate cancer screening schedule. The choice of screening options should make sense and take into consideration the personal risk factors and family history. Exactly when screening starts depends on a number of considerations, primarily based on statistics of prostate cancer and how it occurs among different population groups. Some important considerations include; Family history of prostate, ovarian, breast, colon, or pancreatic cancers among male and female relatives African ancestry Age Where a person lives Watch for These Signs More often than not, there are not fast and true warning signs for prostate cancer. That is because, an active prostate tumor usually [...]

2020-03-03T12:14:39-08:00March 3rd, 2020|

HIFU for prostate cancer shows excellent results in new study

Kia Michel, MD The 12th International Symposium on Focal Therapy and Imaging in Prostate and Kidney Cancer in Washington, D.C. featured Dr. Kia Michel, of Beverly Hills, Calif., who spoke on the outstanding data on focal HIFU outcomes for localized prostate cancer. Dr. Michel presented a poster on near-term HIFU outcomes based on his experience treating men with localized prostate cancer with the Sonablate. He presented that 78 men with prostate cancer underwent HIFU and were tracked post-treatment and re-biopsied at 12 months. He concluded that there was excellent disease control after HIFU ablation and most men were able to retain full urinary continence and erectile function levels equal to those pre-HIFU treatment. “I feel like it is important to report on [...]

2020-02-10T14:04:05-08:00February 10th, 2020|

Benefits of HIFU technology revealed in 3 studies and reports

Three articles have appeared in press since June 2018 based on clinical trials undertaken in the U.K., that highlight the medium to long-term durability of Sonablate treatments in the control of prostate cancer when used in the partial gland ablation setting.1,2,3  Across the three articles and a total of more than 1,800 men, salvage free survival (no need for a whole gland or systemic treatment) was greater than 90% out as far as 60 months.  This excellent disease control was accompanied by a pad-free incontinence rate of greater than 98% and maintenance of erectile function in more than 80% of men. An additional article based on Canadian experience produced roughly similar results. 14 Dr. Mark Carol, CEO of SonaCare Medical writes,“While few will [...]

2020-01-27T13:26:59-08:00January 27th, 2020|

Immunotherapy may add years for prostate cancer patients

Some men with advanced prostate cancer who have exhausted all other treatment options could live for two years or more on immunotherapy, a major clinical trial has shown. Researchers found that a small proportion of men were 'super responders' and were alive and well even after the trial had ended despite having had a very poor prognosis before treatment. The study found that one in 20 men with end-stage prostate cancer responded to the immunotherapy pembrolizumab -- but although the number who benefited was small, these patients sometimes gained years of extra life. The most dramatic responses came in patients whose tumors had mutations in genes involved in repairing DNA, and the researchers are investigating whether this group might especially benefit from immunotherapy. [...]

2019-12-10T09:21:43-08:00December 10th, 2019|

Higher omega-3 levels does not increase prostate cancer risk

Omega-3 shown to protect against heart disease-related death, without increasing prostate cancer risk ---> Should you take omega-3 pills? Or try to have two to servings of omega-3 rich fish a week, as the American Heart Association recommends? It may seem a bit murky if you follow headlines about nutrition and health. That's why researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute continue to research the potential benefits and risks of this popular supplement, especially when it comes to prostate cancer risk and heart health. In one study, the Intermountain research team identified 87 patients who were part of the Intermountain INSPIRE Registry and had developed prostate cancer. These patients were also tested for plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid [...]

2019-11-26T09:28:00-08:00November 19th, 2019|

Researchers identify new factors that may help reduce prostate cancer risk

Men with higher levels of 'free' testosterone and a growth hormone in their blood are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference. Other factors such as older age, ethnicity and a family history of the disease are already known to increase a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. However, the new study of more than 200,000 men is one of the first to show strong evidence of two factors that could possibly be modified to reduce prostate cancer risk. The research was led by Dr Ruth Travis, an Associate Professor, and Ellie Watts, a Research Fellow, both based at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, UK. Dr Travis said: [...]

2019-11-05T08:21:24-08:00November 5th, 2019|

Researchers aim for a paradigm shift in prostate cancer diagnosis

In combination with the current prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, the new test could help men avoid unnecessary and invasive biopsies, over-diagnosis and over-treatment. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western men, with 1.3 million new cases being diagnosed each year worldwide. It is currently detected using a blood test that measures PSA levels. Although it provides early diagnosis, the PSA blood test has a low specificity (high false positives) with about 75 per cent of all PSA positive results ending up with negative biopsies that do not find cancer. When a high PSA level in the blood is detected, the patient undergoes a tissue biopsy of the prostate gland, which is invasive and carries a significant risk of bleeding and [...]

2019-11-26T10:05:32-08:00September 24th, 2019|

Prostate cancer risks may be lowered by mushroom consumption

A new study published in the International Journal of Cancer found an inverse relationship between mushroom consumption and the development of prostate cancer among middle-aged and elderly Japanese men, suggesting that regular mushroom intake might help to prevent prostate cancer. A total of 36,499 men, aged 40 to 79 years who participated in the Miyagi Cohort Study in 1990 and in the Ohsaki Cohort Study in 1994 were followed for a median of 13.2 years. During follow-up, 3.3% of participants developed prostate cancer. Compared with mushroom consumption of less than once per week, consumption once or twice a week was associated with an 8% lower risk of prostate cancer and consumption three or more times per week was associated with a 17% lower [...]

2019-09-17T10:01:10-07:00September 17th, 2019|
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