News

New treatment aimed at halting prostate tumor growth

In 2018, approximately 324,000 men died from cancer in the United States. The combination of lung cancer, prostate cancer and colorectal cancer equated to half of those deaths. Large percentages of each of these cancers can be prevented or treated if caught early. Now, Purdue University scientists have created a new therapy option that may help halt tumor growth in certain cancers such as prostate, which is among the most common types of cancer in men. "We have designed a therapy that can help recruit immune cells to kill cancer and also help repair bone and tissues damaged by tumors," said Marxa Figueiredo, associate professor of basic medical sciences in Purdue's College of Veterinary Medicine, who helped lead the research team and is [...]

2020-04-13T09:36:30-07:00April 13th, 2020|

Researchers search for hereditary prostate cancer in genome study

Vanderbilt researchers have identified haplotypes, ancestral fragments of DNA, that are associated with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) in a first-of-its-kind genomic study made possible by the study of prostate cancer patients with family histories of the disease. The researchers analyzed the Nashville Familial Prostate Cancer Study (NFPCS), in an investigation comparing men with prostate cancer, each from a separate family with a strong history of the disease, to screened men without a personal or family history of prostate cancer. They analyzed haplotypes at a location of chromosome 8 which has been tied to the origin of prostate and numerous additional cancers. The study, published March 23 in Nature Communications, explains roughly 9% of prostate cancer heritability. One mutation increased risk as much as 22-fold. [...]

2020-04-06T13:39:50-07:00April 6th, 2020|

COVID-19 Information for Prostate Cancer Patients

Many who have been affected by prostate cancer, or whose loved ones have been affected by prostate cancer, might be wondering if special precautions need to be taken with the coronavirus pandemic unfolding. We have always believed that evidence out of science and research are the best tools for solving patients’ problems, whether that’s cancer or public health emergencies. As such, we will do our best to use science to provide information and a steady hand in this tumultuous situation. Scientists know that the coronavirus (aka COVID-19 COrona VIrus Disease 2019) can affect your immune system, although we are still learning more. Based on recent data as reported in the journal The Lancet, it appears that the virus hits the immune system early [...]

2020-03-24T09:30:41-07:00March 24th, 2020|

California HIFU is the Right Choice for Prostate Cancer Treatment

For the past five years, Chris Lockheed’s PSA numbers had been going up. Then, when a biopsy revealed that he had two tumors on his prostate. Chris started doing research into what kind of options for treatment were available to him. When a radiation specialist in Rohnert Park told him about Dr. Michael Lazar and the HIFU procedure, he did more homework. Dr. Michael Lazar, 4 time board certified urologist, who has practiced in Santa Rosa for 36 years, investigated and became an early user of a new technology for treatment of prostate cancer called high intensity focused ultrasound, or HIFU. This exciting non-invasive technology uses ultrasound energy to create heat. This heat is precisely aimed at the cancerous portions of the gland to [...]

2020-03-17T10:44:59-07:00March 17th, 2020|

Pilot study repurposes antidepressant to fight prostate cancer

An antidepressant in use for decades, repurposed to fight prostate cancer, shows promise in helping patients whose disease has returned following surgery or radiation, a pilot study at USC shows. The drug -- an MAO inhibitor called phenelzine -- represents a potential new treatment direction with fewer side effects for men with recurrent prostate cancer, researchers said. "To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial of an MAO inhibitor in cancer patients," said senior author Jean Shih, a University Professor in USC's School of Pharmacy who has studied the enzyme MAO, or monoamine oxidase, for four decades. The research appears in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. "If our findings are confirmed, this could be part of a new avenue [...]

2020-03-10T12:53:09-07:00March 10th, 2020|

Diabetes can affect prostate cancer prognosis

Men with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. This could explain why patients with diabetes have a poorer prognosis for prostate cancer. Men with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. This could explain why patients with diabetes have a poorer prognosis for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer [...]

2020-02-24T11:37:44-08:00February 24th, 2020|

Study examines prostate cancer treatment decisions

5-year study examines common prostate cancer treatment options (See new HIFU study results at bottom of this article.) A five-year follow-up study of more than 2,000 U.S. men who received prostate cancer treatment is creating a road map for future patients regarding long-term bowel, bladder and sexual function in order to clarify expectations and enable men to make informed choices about care. The CEASAR (Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation for Localized Prostate Cancer) study, coordinated by Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is a multi-site research study conducting long-term followup on men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2011 and 2012. The five-year results published in JAMA, with lead author Karen Hoffman, MD, MPH, from MD Anderson, provide evidence on outcomes with [...]

2020-02-18T10:25:52-08:00February 18th, 2020|

Benefits of HIFU technology revealed in 3 studies and reports

Three articles have appeared in press since June 2018 based on clinical trials undertaken in the U.K., that highlight the medium to long-term durability of Sonablate treatments in the control of prostate cancer when used in the partial gland ablation setting.1,2,3  Across the three articles and a total of more than 1,800 men, salvage free survival (no need for a whole gland or systemic treatment) was greater than 90% out as far as 60 months.  This excellent disease control was accompanied by a pad-free incontinence rate of greater than 98% and maintenance of erectile function in more than 80% of men. An additional article based on Canadian experience produced roughly similar results. 14 Dr. Mark Carol, CEO of SonaCare Medical writes,“While few will [...]

2020-01-27T13:26:59-08:00January 27th, 2020|

Understanding Prostate Screening & Treatment Options

For some types of cancer, screening can help find cancers at an early stage, when they are more likely to be easier to treat. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer can often be found before symptoms arise by testing the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a man’s blood. Another way to find prostate cancer is the digital rectal exam (DRE), in which the doctor puts a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel the prostate gland. If the results of either one of these tests are abnormal, further testing is often done to see if a man has cancer. If prostate cancer is found as a result of screening with the PSA test or DRE, it will probably be at [...]

2019-12-03T10:47:39-08:00December 3rd, 2019|

Researchers identify new factors that may help reduce prostate cancer risk

Men with higher levels of 'free' testosterone and a growth hormone in their blood are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference. Other factors such as older age, ethnicity and a family history of the disease are already known to increase a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. However, the new study of more than 200,000 men is one of the first to show strong evidence of two factors that could possibly be modified to reduce prostate cancer risk. The research was led by Dr Ruth Travis, an Associate Professor, and Ellie Watts, a Research Fellow, both based at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, UK. Dr Travis said: [...]

2019-11-05T08:21:24-08:00November 5th, 2019|