News

HIFU Patients Urged to Advocate for Reimbursements

Advocating for HIFU Reimbursement Men who may have benefited from HIFU for Prostate Cancer are being asked to help more men receive this life-saving procedure. HIFU Prostate Services and California HIFU is asking past-patients to help newly diagnosed men have a greater opportunity to receive HIFU for prostate cancer by advocating for higher Medicare reimbursement for HIFU. The steps have been outlined below to help with this process, along with tips for being as effective as possible. Finding Your Representatives Click here to search the House of Representatives Click here to search for your Senators Write a Letter to Your Representatives in Congress Now that you have found your representatives in Congress and the Senate, one of the easiest ways to help is to [...]

2019-02-26T08:19:47-07:00February 26th, 2019|

Active surveillance nearly tripled in men with low-risk prostate disease

Many men with low-risk prostate cancer who most likely previously would have undergone immediate surgery or radiation are now adopting a more conservative "active surveillance" strategy, according to an analysis of a new federal database by scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The use of active surveillance increased from 14.5 percent to 42.1 percent of men with low-risk prostate cancer between 2010 and 2015, said the researchers, led by Brandon Mahal, MD, from the department of radiation oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center who led the study published by JAMA. During that same period, the percentage of men undergoing radical prostatectomy (removal of the prostate gland) declined from 47.4 percent to 31.3 percent. The use of radiotherapy for low-risk disease dropped from 38.0 percent [...]

2019-02-12T11:42:12-07:00February 12th, 2019|

Prostate Cancer News: PSA screening significantly reduces the risk for death

After differences in implementation and settings were accounted for, two important prostate cancer screening trials provide compatible evidence that screening reduces prostate cancer mortality. After differences in implementation and settings were accounted for, two important prostate cancer screening trials provide compatible evidence that screening reduces prostate cancer mortality. These findings suggest that current guidelines recommending against routine PSA-based screening may be revised. However, questions remain about how to implement screening so that the benefits outweigh the potential harms of over-diagnosis and overtreatment. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Current guidelines from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommend against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer because the evidence for the test showed very low probability that it would [...]

2019-01-16T09:41:10-07:00January 16th, 2019|

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancer

A new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. There is considerable debate surrounding the value of prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, and the 2012 United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against PSA testing lies at the center of this debate. This recommendation was made in part due to the potential harms -- such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence -- associated with the treatment of clinically insignificant prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy or radiation. To examine the [...]

2019-01-15T11:04:18-07:00January 15th, 2019|

Study finds needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research, which is published in the January edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. Researchers say that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations. "We have discovered new molecular markers that can help guide men in their decisions about the course of their prostate cancer care," says George Vasmatzis, [...]

2019-01-08T11:03:52-07:00January 8th, 2019|

Excess body weight contributes to aggressive prostate cancer risk

Researchers look at differences between states with the highest and lowest proportions of cancers attributable to excess body weight A new study looking at the share of cancers related to obesity finds an at least 1.5-fold difference between states with the highest and lowest proportions. The proportion of cancer cases that could be attributable to excess body weight ranged from a high of 8.3% in the District of Columbia to a low of 5.9% in Hawaii, reflecting variations in obesity rates in the states. The study appears in JAMA Oncology. Excess body weight is an established cause of cancer, currently known to be linked to 13 cancers. While differences in excess body weight among states in the United States are well-known, there is little [...]

2019-01-02T10:35:55-07:00January 2nd, 2019|

New test may significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation

For men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis is a crucial determinant of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as well as other cancers, primary tumor growth or spread is driven by amplifications or deletions of portions of the genome known as copy number alterations (CNAs). A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new assay to assess CNAs that is cheaper, faster, reproducible, and requires less tissue than other diagnostic techniques and has the potential to significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation. Metastases occur in approximately 16 percent of prostate cancers and account for 8 percent of all male cancer deaths. Accurate prediction at the time of diagnosis can identify [...]

2018-12-18T08:37:55-07:00December 18th, 2018|

Study discovers link between inflammatory bowel disease and prostate cancer

. Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, reports a 20-year study from Northwestern Medicine. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk of potentially dangerous prostate cancer. About 1 million men have inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S. Inflammatory bowel disease is a common chronic condition that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. "These patients may need to be screened more carefully than a man without inflammatory bowel disease," said lead study author Dr. Shilajit Kundu. "If a man with inflammatory bowel disease has an elevated PSA, it may be an [...]

2018-12-11T08:37:12-07:00December 11th, 2018|

Understanding Prostate Screening & Treatment Options

For some types of cancer, screening can help find cancers at an early stage, when they are more likely to be easier to treat. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer can often be found before symptoms arise by testing the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a man’s blood. Another way to find prostate cancer is the digital rectal exam (DRE), in which the doctor puts a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel the prostate gland. If the results of either one of these tests are abnormal, further testing is often done to see if a man has cancer. If prostate cancer is found as a result of screening with the PSA test or DRE, it will probably be at [...]

2018-11-26T10:28:35-07:00November 26th, 2018|

New study looks to determine type of prostate cancer — dangerous or manageable

Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy. A recent study showed that more than 25 men were being unnecessarily treated with surgery or radiotherapy, for every single life saved. It is believed that success rates could be hindered as a result of treating all prostate cancers in the same way. A team at the University of York and the University of British Columbia, Canada, however, have designed a test that can pick out life-threatening prostate cancers, with up to 92% accuracy. Professor Norman Maitland, from the University of York's Department of Biology, said: "Unnecessary prostate treatment has both physical consequences for patients and their families, [...]

2018-11-20T07:52:53-07:00November 20th, 2018|