Phone: (707) 546-5553
Email Us
1140 Sonoma Avenue 1-A
Santa Rosa, CA 95405

HIFU

Doctor’s Own Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Leads to Early Intervention and Positive Results with HIFU

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU shares the story of how friend and fellow surgeon Dr. Robert Pugach underwent HIFU treatment for prostate cancer following an early diagnosis with the disease.

Dr. Robert Pugach

It’s the news no man wants to hear from a doctor, “… you have prostate cancer.” And when you are a practicing physician who receives this news, all the more room for concern. Dr. Robert Pugach, medical director of Pacific Coast Urology Medical Center was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year and opted to undergo HIFU treatment with urologist and prostate cancer specialist Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU earlier this month. What transpired is truly an inspirational account of one man’s journey from diagnosis to cure. Dr. Pugach has chronicled his experience in a series of blog posts featured on the HIFU Prostate Services Website.

Following a cancer diagnosis by an internist and a follow-up biopsy with Dr. Lazar, Dr. Pugach opted to forgo the wait and watch approach most commonly prescribed for men testing with low levels of PSA. “I’m not a gambler, especially when it comes to my health,” he says. “I plan to live a long, healthy life.”

As a prostate cancer expert himself, Dr. Puach was all too aware of the potential for permanent urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction with more conventional treatments, and was adamant about avoiding radiation due to the likelihood of a cancer recurrence in the future. Bolstered by his own experience with HIFU combined with positive results viewed first-hand with his own brother who underwent HIFU almost a decade earlier, Dr. Pauch was in the perfect frame of mind for pursing HIFU for himself.

In the weeks leading up to the procedure with Dr. Lazar and California HIFU, Dr. Pauch reasoned that there was absolutely nothing to fear, having been diagnosed early and having confidence in his doctor gave him a sense of empowerment over the disease.

“I had complete and total confidence in my doctor. I had the luxury of knowing Dr. Lazar well for 10 years when we travelled out of the country with our patients to treat their cancers with HIFU. When you watch someone in the OR, a fellow doctor like me can tell instantly what his skill level is. In Michael Lazar’s case, he is as good as one can get and is a true professional,” he explains.

HIFU: Non-invasive Treatment for Prostate Cancer

HIFU is a FDA approved precise and targeted therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, that reduces the risk of complications caused by surgery and radiation. HIFU uses ultrasound energy, or sound waves, to heat and destroy specifically targeted areas of tissue. During HIFU, the sound waves pass through healthy tissue without causing damage. At the focal point of the sound waves (like a magnifying glass focusing the rays of the sun to burn a leaf), the tissue temperature is raised only high enough to destroy the targeted tissue.

“Although recommendations are that most men opt to wait and watch when diagnosed with prostate cancer, HIFU is a treatment that is most effective for men who have early stage, localized prostate cancer that has not spread or metastasized outside the prostate,” explains Dr. Lazar. “As with Dr. Pugach the results are most promising when the cancer is caught while it is at the early, more treatable stage. That means; taking action relatively soon following the diagnosis.”

A happy ending to a terrifying diagnosis

On May 9th Dr. Pugach took a taxi to the San Francisco Surgery Center where Dr. Lazar performs HIFU. There the new patient was greeted by “… a wonderful and caring staff.” A short four hours later, the procedure is over and Dr. Lazar reported to the patient that all is well. “Dr. Lazar told me my procedure went perfectly – good words to hear!”

As most HIFU patients report, Dr. Pugach says there was no pain following the procedure and recovery was swift. “I learned that what I had always told my patients about how good they would feel afterwards was now proven to me to be true. Instead of having the common side effects of radical surgery, or contemplating seven weeks of radiation, I felt great…”

Dr. Pugach says he knows how good it feels to have a potentially serious or lethal disease diagnosed at a stage where it is less frightening to deal with. “I’ve learned how wonderful and enduring a good doctor-patient relationship can be and how a good bedside manner does more than many medications in helping a patient feel good.”

The moral of this story may well be to consider all of the options when dealing with prostate cancer, and although the temptation might be to put off routine screenings, early diagnosis might just save your life.

“Screening for prostate cancer is a simple process that allows us to look for cancer before any symptoms become obvious to the patient,” explains Dr. Lazar. “This process can help us discover the cancer at an earlier stage while the patient has the opportunity to take advantage of newer, less invasive options for treating prostate cancer such as HIFU.”

About California HIFU and Dr. Lazar

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use HIFU for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar formed California HIFU in order to offer minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment to men with the Sonablate. For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553 or visit our website: www.californiahifu.com.

Dr. Pugach’s full story “When the Doctor Becomes the Patient” may be viewed online in an ongoing series on the HIFU Prostate Services Website.

 

New blood test better at predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

A new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease. By identifying molecular changes in the PSA protein, the findings of this study suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may reduce the need for biopsy, and may lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.

A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.

By identifying molecular changes in the prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein, the findings, published online last month by European Urology, suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.

The research team, led by Cleveland Clinic’s Eric Klein, M.D., conducted a multi center prospective study of 261 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at five academic and community centers in the U.S. enrolled between August 2015 and December 2016.

“Despite criticism, PSA has transformed the landscape of early detection, screening, and management of prostate cancer in the last few decades,” said Dr. Klein, chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute. “Unfortunately, PSA is tissue-specific but not cancer-specific, leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment of biologically insignificant cancers, which is widely recognized as a key limitation in its clinical utility.”

The study directly compared the clinical performance of a new test based on PSA, called IsoPSA, to PSA itself with patients already scheduled for prostate biopsy. IsoPSA proved significantly superior to PSA in two key indications: discriminating between prostate cancer and benign conditions; and identifying patients with high-grade disease. The former indication is potentially useful for using IsoPSA for screening by primary care physicians, while the second is helpful for urologists in identifying patients who would benefit from curative intent therapy and other applications.

The results show that if validated and adopted clinically, IsoPSA could significantly reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies by almost 50 percent. “The methodology used in the IsoPSA assay represents a significant departure from conventional ways to define biomarkers in blood, and may be applicable to improving other cancer biomarkers,” said Dr. Klein.

“Due to its inherent simplicity, requiring only a blood draw and presenting information to the physician in familiar context using a single number — just like PSA itself — we are quite hopeful in IsoPSA’s future utility after further validation studies,” said Mark Stovsky, M.D., co-author and staff member, Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute.


Story Source: Materials provided by Cleveland Clinic.

Journal Reference: Eric A. Klein, Arnon Chait, Jason M. Hafron, Kenneth M. Kernen, Kannan Manickam, Andrew J. Stephenson, Mathew Wagner, Hui Zhu, Aimee Kestranek, Boris Zaslavsky, Mark Stovsky. The Single-parameter, Structure-based IsoPSA Assay Demonstrates Improved Diagnostic Accuracy for Detection of Any Prostate Cancer and High-grade Prostate Cancer Compared to a Concentration-based Assay of Total Prostate-specific Antigen: A Preliminary Repo. European Urology, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.eururo.2017.03.025

Read this article on Science Daily. “New blood test is more accurate in predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA: IsoPSA assay can help in determining the need for prostate biopsy for patients.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170515122149.htm.

By | May 16th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Focused ultrasound therapy is here: Are you ready?

A new, highly disruptive therapeutic technology called focused ultrasound is transforming – standards of care around the globe.

In this series, we asked speakers at the Milken Institute Global Conference to answer: How does one build a meaningful life in the age of technological disruption? Join the conversation by writing your own article here and including #MIGlobal.

A new, highly disruptive therapeutic technology called focused ultrasound is slowly but definitively influencing – and on the verge of transforming – standards of care around the globe. This game-changing, noninvasive treatment option for a wide variety of serious medical disorders has the potential to be an alternative or adjunct to surgery, radiation therapy, drug delivery, and cancer immunotherapy, while decreasing cost of care and improving outcomes for millions worldwide. If it sounds too good to be true, it isn’t. Focused ultrasound has been named one of the 50 greatest inventions by TIME magazine, credited with “changing medicine” by Fortune magazine, and just this month was named a top 10 clinical research achievement of 2016 by the Washington, DC-based Clinical Research Forum.

Innovation breeds innovation, but also, modification. Once fully developed and implemented – months to decades from now depending on the clinical indication – focused ultrasound will have widespread impact on healthcare constituents including physicians, treatment facilities, and manufacturers of legacy therapy equipment, among others. This process has in fact already begun. Focused ultrasound will also bring about major change to referral patterns, treatment paradigms, practice guidelines, and equipment acquisition as the technology transitions to a mainstream therapy.

In order to benefit from these changes, stakeholders – perhaps your organization or yourself – must be prepared to enter the field early on. And for many, “early on” means now.

What is focused ultrasound?

Focused ultrasound, or FUS, uses ultrasonic energy to target tissue deep in the body without incisions or radiation. With more than 22 regulatory approvals around the world to date, including five by the US Food and Drug Administration and more than 50 additional clinical indications in various (mostly early) stages of development, FUS may treat a disparate range of diseases including: Parkinson’s; Alzheimer’s; depression; obsessive-compulsive disorder; arthritis; back pain; and, tumors of the brain, breast, prostate, liver and pancreas. It has the potential to be as revolutionary to therapy as magnetic resonance scanning (MRI) has been to diagnosis.

The basic principle is analogous to using a magnifying glass to focus beams of sunlight on a single point to burn a hole in a leaf. With focused ultrasound, multiple intersecting beams of ultrasound energy are concentrated on a target deep in the body with extreme precision and accuracy (sparing adjacent normal tissue). Where each individual beam passes through the body there is no effect. But at the focal point where the beams converge, the focused ultrasound energy induces a variety of biologic effects including: destroying tissue, stimulating the body’s immune response, and enhancing the delivery of drugs. The location of the focal point and the treatment effect is guided and controlled in real time by ultrasound or MR imaging.

Besides patients, who will focused ultrasound affect?

Three healthcare industry groups will be particularly impacted by the widespread adoption of FUS. First, consider the manufacturers of legacy therapy equipment (e.g., linear accelerators for radiation therapy and robotic surgical devices) to which focused ultrasound is an existential threat. These manufacturers would be wise to begin redistributing resources from their traditional product lines now to invest in new FUS technology. Such companies are in fact well-positioned to do so as they already have the functioning sales, marketing, support and distribution channels in place. It is clear that once the medical community broadly understands the capabilities of focused ultrasound, many legacy therapy equipment options will quickly become obsolete.

Physicians will also benefit from entering the FUS field sooner rather than later. In the current environment, many physicians – not all – can unfortunately be motivated by money, time and outcome, in that order. As focused ultrasound advances, they will need to become educated and trained in utilizing FUS technology, and adopt it as part of their practice, even in cases where the economics on a per procedure basis are less favorable than current therapy alternatives. If they choose not to, patients seeking FUS – and demand is growing – will simply find a physician who will. Of note: focused ultrasound centers worldwide are reporting a backlog of several hundred essential tremor patients desiring FUS, and a nationwide study of nearly 1,000 US uterine fibroid sufferers (published in the October 2013 issues of both the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Journal of Women’s Health) found that when presented with fibroid treatment descriptions, the majority surveyed (60%) rated focused ultrasound as their top treatment choice.

Finally, now is also the time for hospitals and clinics to consider becoming early adopters of focused ultrasound. Doing so will enhance their reputation as being on the leading edge of medical care, and will provide a competitive differential over institutions that have not yet acquired FUS technology (see above regarding patient demand and preference). Additionally, offering focused ultrasound will create a halo effect for the hospital or clinic when patients are referred for this cutting-edge treatment and found to not be a candidate; these patients will often choose to stay with the practice and receive an alternative treatment, increasing market share for the institution.

The future is now

We are all aware that medical device development and adoption occurs exponentially; with focused ultrasound we are right now at the beginning of the inflection point of the curve. Our goal is to treat hundreds of thousands of patients annually and we are well on our way, with 15,000 FUS treatments performed worldwide in 2014, approximately 25,000 treatments in 2015, and a more than double increase to 50,000-plus patients treated in 2016. In other words, focused ultrasound is about to evolve into a robust medical field, with the pace of research and development, publications, patient treatments and the number of device manufacturers all increasing rapidly in the past few years.

Still, there remains an enormous amount of work to be done, and many barriers to overcome, before the technology becomes a standard of care that can help millions of patients. But we are closer than ever. When the potential of focused ultrasound is realized and it becomes a mainstream therapy, it will result in changes that will benefit countless patients and impact physicians, payers/providers, manufacturers, hospitals/clinics, caretakers, etc., around the globe. It’s coming. It is reinventing care. Are you ready?

Find out more at www.fusfoundation.org

About the Author: Neal F. Kassell, M.D., is the founder and chairman of the Focused Ultrasound Foundation. He was a Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia from 1984 until 2016 and was the Co-Chairman of the department until 2006. He received both his undergraduate and medical education at the University of Pennsylvania. In April 2016, Dr. Kassell was appointed by Vice President Joe Biden to the National Cancer Institute’s Blue Ribbon Panel for Cancer Moonshot Initiative. Dr. Kassell has contributed more than 500 publications and book chapters to the literature and is a member of numerous medical societies in the United States and abroad.

The Focused Ultrasound Foundation is a medical research, education, and advocacy organization created as the catalyst to accelerate the development and adoption of FUS, shortening the time from laboratory research to widespread patient treatment. 

By | May 4th, 2017|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Study reveals genetic connection to aggressive prostate cancer

An international study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has identified a genetic connection to the aggressive form of prostate cancer. The study showed a threefold increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer for men with the genetic mutation. The frequency of the gene variants varied from 6 to 14% of the population of men with prostate cancer.

Much like the association between BRCA gene mutation and the risk for breast cancer in women changed the approach to treatment/ prevention, the identification of the Kallikrein 6 gene region may change the course of prostate cancer care through a blood test developed by the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute.

The study was led by Dr. Alexandre Zlotta, Director of Uro-Oncology at Mount Sinai Hospital, and researcher with the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, part of Sinai Health System in Toronto, Canada, and Dr. Paul Boutros, Principal Investigator, Informatics and Bio-computing, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR). The first author of the paper was Dr. Laurent Briollais, Senior Investigator, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute.

These findings are important because it is well established that most men will die with prostate cancer, and not from the disease. Dr. Zlotta was the lead author of a study in 2013 which revealed the unexpected high prevalence of indolent prostate cancer in men. Diagnosing the aggressive form of the disease is an important unmet need.

“As an oncologist I know firsthand how valuable it would be to have a genetic tool that could help choose the best course of action with my patients,” explains Zlotta. “It would help spare patients with indolent disease from unnecessary treatments and their side effects and aid in the diagnosis and directing patients with aggressive disease to the appropriate treatment.” Up until now, no single test could predict the severity of the cancer type- the current PSA test (Kallikrein 3), which is located near Kallikrein 6, only identifies the risk of prostate cancer, not the severity.

To identify the relevant mutations the scientists analyzed the blood samples of 1,858 men from three independent cohorts in Europe and North America: the Swiss arm of the European Randomized Study for Prostate Cancer Screening, the large American Screening trial, Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO), Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (University Health Network) and Mount Sinai Hospital (Sinai Health System) in Toronto. The KLK6 variants also independently predicted treatment failure after surgery or radiation for prostate cancer in an independent cohort of 130 men from the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).


Story Source:

Materials provided by Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laurent Briollais, Hilmi Ozcelik, Jingxiong Xu, Maciej Kwiatkowski, Emilie Lalonde, Dorota H. Sendorek, Neil E. Fleshner, Franz Recker, Cynthia Kuk, Ekaterina Olkhov-Mitsel, Tristan Juvet, Ioannis Prassas, John Trachtenberg, Ants Toi, Michael Fraser, Theodorus van der Kwast, Robert G. Bristow, Bharati Bapat, Eleftherios P. Diamandis, Paul C. Boutros, Alexandre R. Zlotta. Germline Mutations in the Kallikrein 6 Region and Predisposition for Aggressive Prostate Cancer. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2017; 109 (4) DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djw258

Read this article on ScienceDaily:

“Genetic association with aggressive prostate cancer discovered: Study showed a threefold increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer for men with the genetic mutation..” 16 March 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170316141120.htm.

By | March 21st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Dr. Michael Lazar Offers Free HIFU Presentation Online

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU recently gave a presentation in Santa Rosa discussing the benefits of high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer and now offers the presentation online.

A public presentation recently held in Santa Rosa for a group gathered to learn more about high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) provided an overview of how this exciting new prostate cancer treatment works, and included comparisons to other treatment options, as well as HIFU patient outcomes. The event also offered people a chance to meet Dr. Lazar who is a four-time board certified urologist and prostate cancer specialist providing HIFU to patients in California. It also gave attendees a chance to learn more prostate cancer and to ask important questions.

During the presentation, Dr. Lazar discussed how HIFU offers hope for prostate cancer patients by targeting cancer cells through a focused precision technology with minimal to no side effects. The procedure is accomplished in a one to four-hour session and patients return to their normal routines fairly quickly. “Our recent presentation was so well received, we wanted to be able to offer it to a wider audience,” explained Dr. Lazar. “By providing this information to patients online we hope to be able to educate men who currently have prostate cancer about HIFU as a treatment option, and to perhaps provide some important answers to unasked questions.”

About HIFU

Although relatively new to the U.S. Sonablate® technology has been used around the world on more than 15,000 patients in over 30 countries for more than 15 years. Approximately 4,000 U.S. men have received HIFU treatment outside the U.S. prior to FDA approval.

“I started treating with HIFU in 2007 and since receiving FDA approval in 2015 began offering the treatment in San Francisco,” Dr. Lazar said.  Prior to FDA approval Dr. Lazar explained that he performed outpatient procedures at a U.S. Joint Commission approved bilingual hospital in Mexico – helping to bring this innovative prostate cancer treatment to hundreds of men diagnosed with the disease. During that time, Dr. Lazar also served as a HIFU instructor for other physicians and is now actively training doctors in HIFU for prostate cancer in San Francisco.

Serving as Medical Director for HIFU Prostate Services (HPS) Dr. Lazar founded California HIFU to provide HIFU services in the San Francisco area, the first such facility on the west coast. Since that time HIFU using Sonablate® technology has become available in more than 40 locations across the nation.

For patients with prostate cancer, HIFU treatment is most effective in the early stages, where it is localized to the prostate. Performed on an out-patient basis, the procedure is able to preserve healthy tissue and nerves, so urine flow and erectile function is maintained in a high percent of cases. “This is an extremely well tolerated procedure,” said Dr. Lazar. “Patients return to normal activity very quickly. There is no blood loss and very little pain when compared to other treatments for prostate cancer.”

Dr. Lazar explains how all prostate cancer treatments can have side effects. But with HIFU the side effects are lower than with any of the other treatments for prostate cancer. “Unique to HIFU, if you have an HIFU treatment and still require additional treatment, patients can opt to have a second HIFU treatment, or any other treatment they decide to pursue,” he says.

The presentation is free and available online on the California HIFU YouTube Channel accessible by following this link: HIFU YouTube Channel.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Lazar is part of Northern California Medical Associates and operates California HIFU in Santa Rosa. He is the medical director of HIFU Prostate Services, LLC, a leading provider of minimally-invasive prostate cancer treatments using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Dr. Lazar is also a clinical partner with HPS with the HIFU San Francisco Surgery Center of Excellence, a state-of-the-art facility that is convenient to hotels and the airport.  For more information about Dr. Lazar, HIFU treatment for prostate cancer visit the HIFU website or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

 

 

By | March 6th, 2017|HIFU, News|0 Comments

New discovery may lead to blood test predicting and preventing prostate cancer spread

University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered a new pathway which regulates the spread of prostate cancer around the body.

Published in the journal Cancer Research, the discovery has potential to lead to the development of a blood test that could predict whether cancer will spread from the prostate tumour to other parts of the body. The research also reveals potential new targets for drugs that may inhibit the spread of cancer.

“Prostate cancers only kill men after they have spread or ‘metastasised’ from the prostate,” says project leader Dr Luke Selth, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide’s Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories and a member of the Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men’s Health.

“The identification of markers that accurately predict, at an early stage, prostate tumours that are likely to metastasise could guide the urgency and aggressiveness of treatment — and this could save lives.”

The international research team — led by the University of Adelaide and including members from the University of Michigan, Vancouver Prostate Centre, the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University — showed that a specific microRNA (a type of molecule involved in regulating the level and activity of genes) called miR-194 promotes cancer metastasis by inhibiting a key protein called SOCS2. SOCS2 can suppress the spread of cancer cells.

“In previous work, we had found that a high level of miR-194 in a patient’s blood was associated with rapid relapse of prostate cancer following surgical removal of the tumour,” says Dr Selth. “This new work explains why miR-194 is associated with a poor outcome, and in the process reveals a completely novel pathway regulating prostate cancer metastasis.

“Importantly, measuring miR-194 in a patient’s blood at the time of diagnosis could become a test for the likelihood of metastasis. Patients with high levels of miR-194 in their blood could receive more aggressive treatment to reduce the chance of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body.” Dr Selth’s team is currently testing this idea using larger patient groups to validate their findings.

Dr Selth says miR-194 also represents a potential therapeutic target. “There are currently no drugs that effectively inhibit the spread of prostate cancer,” he says. “We propose that inhibiting miR-194 could reduce rates of metastasis in patients with aggressive disease, but the development of a drug to achieve this goal is still a long way off.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Rajdeep Das, Phillip A Gregory, Rayzel C Fernandes, Iza Denis, Qingqing Wang, Scott L Townley, Shuang G. Zhao, Adrienne Hanson, Marie A Pickering, Heather K Armstrong, Noor A Lokman, Esmaeil Ebrahimie, Elai Davicioni, Robert B. Jenkins, R. Jeffrey Karnes, Ashley E. Ross, Robert B Den, Eric A. Klein, Kim N. Chi, Hayley S Ramshaw, Elizabeth D Williams, Amina Zoubedi, Gregory J Goodall, Felix Y. Feng, Lisa M. Butler, Wayne D Tilley, Luke A Selth. MicroRNA-194 promotes prostate cancer metastasis by inhibiting SOCS2. Cancer Research, 2016; canres.2529.2016 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-2529

Read this article on ScienceDaily:

University of Adelaide. “Predicting and preventing prostate cancer spread.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125091702.htm.
By | February 21st, 2017|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Free HIFU Info Session Scheduled for February

Do you have prostate cancer?

There is now a non-invasive treatment option.

Join Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU for a special Prostate Cancer Treatment Information session scheduled for Thurs., Feb. 16, 2017 at 7 p.m. This free session will be held at the Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95405. Dr. Lazar will discuss how Sonablate HIFU can treat Prostate Cancer with lower risk of side effects such as impotence and incontinence. HIFU is radiation free – provides quick recovery – requires no chemotherapy and no surgery.

Free and open to the public. Call for reservations today Jennifer Radovich 707-546-5553.

Refreshments will be provided.

Brought to you by HIFU Prostate Services and California HIFU.

By | January 31st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Prostate Cancer Rates Take a Nose Dive Per Latest Statistics

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU, Urologist and Prostate Cancer expert reflects on the latest American Cancer Society statics

The results from the American Cancer Society’s newest report on cancer rates is good news for everyone and particularly good news for prostate cancer patients: incidents of cancer is down as is the likelihood of prostate cancer patients dying from the diagnosis.

According to the report the cancer death rate has dropped from its peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 161.2 in 2014 (per 100K population), the most recent year for which data was available to analyze. Overall the decline in cancer is linked with decreases in smoking and advances in early detection and treatment. The four major cancer drops are:

  • lung (- 43% between 1990 and 2014 among males and -17% between 2002 and 2014 among females)
  • breast (-38% from 1989 to 2014)
  • prostate (-51% from 1993 to 2014)
  • colorectal (-51% from 1976 to 2014)

“This is really exciting news for anyone who specializes in prostate cancer,” says Michael Lazar, M.D. “And its particularly good news for our patients. When a man is diagnosed with cancer, whether it’s prostate cancer or some other cancer – the news is always difficult to accept. With the number of people being diagnosed with prostate cancer dropping steadily along with the expected death rates, patients are now more empowered to be optimistic about their treatment options.”

According to the American Cancer Society, the decline in new cancer rates for men can be attributed to the recent drop in prostate cancer diagnoses. This has to do with the fact that routine screening with the PSA blood test is no longer recommended out of concerns for over-diagnosis and treatment of positive results that are best left untreated. Therefore, fewer cases of prostate cancer are now being detected. But this does not need to lessen the importance of getting screened for prostate cancer when symptoms are apparent.

“Although this is really good news, men who are concerned about prostate cancer, and anyone in the high-risk group still needs to be to screened early and at regular intervals,” says Dr. Lazar. “Once cancer has advanced beyond the prostate gland, available treatment options become more radical.”

The highest risk groups for prostate cancer are men over the age of 50, African-American men, and men who have a father, brother or son who has had prostate cancer.

About Prostate Cancer

Most prostate cancers tend to grow slowly, and don’t cause obvious health problems for men who have received a diagnosis. In certain situations, prostate cancer can be managed conservatively, especially in elderly men. But one treatment that stands out among more invasive options for prostate cancer is High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and it is most effective for men who have been diagnose and are in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, this is one technology that requires vigilance at the early stages when HIFU would be most effective for prostate cancer eradication.

“For patients with prostate cancer, HIFU treatment is most effective in the early stages,” explains Dr. Lazar. “When the cancer is localized to the prostate treatment by HIFU is extremely effective. Unlike other treatments, this procedure preserves healthy tissue and nerves, so urine flow and erectile function is maintained in a high percent of cases, as compared to radical surgery or radiation.”

The oncological results for HIFU is comparable to more traditional prostate cancer treatments including radical surgery or radiation. But the side effects for HIFU patients have proven to be much less debilitating than more radical procedures.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar formed California HIFU to offer minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment to men with the Sonablate.

For more information about HIFU treatment which is now available in San Francisco, or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553. Visit us online to learn more.

 

Researchers unravel genetic codes to determine why inherited prostate cancer is so deadly

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

Canadian and Australian prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

The findings, published online in Nature Communications, show that BRCA2-associated tumours are already pre-set to be aggressive, even before treatment. This is because the genes normally involved in regulating cell growth and division are abnormal in the BRCA2-associated cancers right from the get-go and therefore are resistant to therapy right up front, says co-principal investigator Dr. Robert Bristow, clinician-scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. In the Nature Communications study, Dr. Bristow and co-principal investigators Dr. Paul Boutros at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and Prof.

Gail Risbridger at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, compared 15 patients with BRCA2-inherited prostate cancer with 500 prostate cancer patients from the general population with non-inherited (“sporadic”) prostate cancer. In the related study of 500 tumours from Canadian men with non-inherited prostate cancer also published in Nature, Drs. Bristow and Boutros analyses led to the discovery of a new genetic fingerprint that identifies when curable disease may turn aggressive.Although BRCA2-inherited disease affects less than 2 per cent of men with prostate cancer, Dr. Bristow says the research sets the stage to rethink ways to use other drugs differently to personalize treatment for more men.

“The pathways that we discovered to be abnormal in the localized BRCA2-associated cancers are usually only found in general population cancers when they become resistant to hormone therapy and spread through the body,” says Dr. Bristow. “These include pathways related to the repair of DNA damage, cell division, the receptor for the male hormone testosterone and cell-to-cell signaling. “We now know need to explore the use of novel therapies to offset the BRCA2-associated aggressiveness earlier on in the treatment of these men and improve survival in an otherwise lethal tumour,” he says. “This might include different types of chemotherapy or the use of molecular-targeted drugs that specifically target the changes associated with BRCA2 mutation.”

“This is an exciting time in prostate cancer research in which the genetics of individual men and their cancers are beginning to dictate precise and customized treatment,” he adds. “It is an example of the power of international collaboration and team science to crack the genetic code even in the rarest of tumours.”

See this story on Science Daily: 9 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170109125240.htm
Story Source: Materials provided by University Health Network (UHN). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
By | January 10th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Sonablate HIFU Tissue Change Monitoring

HIFU, which stands for high intensity focused ultrasound is a recently approved new technology for prostate tissue ablation. Many urologists have worked with HIFU for several years to offer their patients a minimally invasive treatment option for prostate cancer, either as a part of a clinical trial or at international treatment centers outside the United States.

There are currently two different medical devices that use HIFU energy to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate. The most technologically advanced HIFU device for prostate cancer is called the Sonablate. The Sonablate is a software directed device that includes a computer console, a transrectal probe and a chilling unit. The Sonablate software that physicians use to plan and execute Sonablate HIFU treatment has state-of-the-art features that make it the safest and most precise HIFU device for prostate disease available.

Using the Sonablate state-of-the-art software physicians obtain real-time images of the prostate that are used to map out and target exactly where HIFU should be delivered. Once treatment plan is mapped, HIFU energy is delivered to those areas.

One of the unique key features that the Sonablate has is called Tissue Change Monitoring, or more simply, TCM.

What is TCM?

The most simple way to explain it is that TCM allows the treating HIFU doctor to monitor changes that happen to the tissue in the prostate after the HIFU energy has been delivered. This monitoring of tissue is important because the doctor will immediately know if enough energy has been delivered to effectively destroy the tissue.

While HIFU is being delivered to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate, physicians have the ability to monitor how the tissue is changing and reacting. The Sonablate gives unique feedback on changes to the tissue so the doctor can monitor exactly what is happening and make adjustments as needed for the best outcomes.

Read the full story here …

High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. Visit our website to learn More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 20th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments