Dr. Michael Lazar

Prostate Cancer News: PSA screening significantly reduces the risk for death

After differences in implementation and settings were accounted for, two important prostate cancer screening trials provide compatible evidence that screening reduces prostate cancer mortality. After differences in implementation and settings were accounted for, two important prostate cancer screening trials provide compatible evidence that screening reduces prostate cancer mortality. These findings suggest that current guidelines recommending against routine PSA-based screening may be revised. However, questions remain about how to implement screening so that the benefits outweigh the potential harms of over-diagnosis and overtreatment. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Current guidelines from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommend against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer because the evidence for the test showed very low probability that it would [...]

2019-01-16T09:41:10+00:00January 16th, 2019|

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancer

A new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. There is considerable debate surrounding the value of prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, and the 2012 United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against PSA testing lies at the center of this debate. This recommendation was made in part due to the potential harms -- such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence -- associated with the treatment of clinically insignificant prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy or radiation. To examine the [...]

2019-01-15T11:04:18+00:00January 15th, 2019|

Study finds needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research, which is published in the January edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. Researchers say that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations. "We have discovered new molecular markers that can help guide men in their decisions about the course of their prostate cancer care," says George Vasmatzis, [...]

2019-01-08T11:03:52+00:00January 8th, 2019|

#1 New Year’s Resolution for Men: Get screened for prostate cancer

#1 New Year’s Resolution for Men: Get screened for prostate cancer   Santa Rosa urologist and prostate cancer expert Dr. Michael Lazar provides an overview of prostate cancer screening options; says early detection saves lives. “Knowing the many options for treating prostate cancer is something all men at risk of developing the disease need to be informed about,” says Dr. Lazar. “Most men know about the unpleasant side effects that go along with traditional models of prostate cancer treatment, including urinary incontinence, bowel and erectile dysfunction. But some of the newer treatment modalities such as HIFU (high-intensity focused ultrasound) can only be undertaken at the early stages, when damage to surrounding tissue can best be mitigated, and most side effects eliminated.” Why Early [...]

2018-12-26T07:42:24+00:00December 26th, 2018|

New test may significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation

For men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis is a crucial determinant of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as well as other cancers, primary tumor growth or spread is driven by amplifications or deletions of portions of the genome known as copy number alterations (CNAs). A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new assay to assess CNAs that is cheaper, faster, reproducible, and requires less tissue than other diagnostic techniques and has the potential to significantly enhance prostate cancer evaluation. Metastases occur in approximately 16 percent of prostate cancers and account for 8 percent of all male cancer deaths. Accurate prediction at the time of diagnosis can identify [...]

2018-12-18T08:37:55+00:00December 18th, 2018|

New study looks to determine type of prostate cancer — dangerous or manageable

Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy. A recent study showed that more than 25 men were being unnecessarily treated with surgery or radiotherapy, for every single life saved. It is believed that success rates could be hindered as a result of treating all prostate cancers in the same way. A team at the University of York and the University of British Columbia, Canada, however, have designed a test that can pick out life-threatening prostate cancers, with up to 92% accuracy. Professor Norman Maitland, from the University of York's Department of Biology, said: "Unnecessary prostate treatment has both physical consequences for patients and their families, [...]

2018-11-20T07:52:53+00:00November 20th, 2018|

Scientists take step towards identifying management of prostate cancers

Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy. A recent study showed that more than 25 men were being unnecessarily treated with surgery or radiotherapy, for every single life saved. It is believed that success rates could be hindered as a result of treating all prostate cancers in the same way. A team at the University of York and the University of British Columbia, Canada, however, have designed a test that can pick out life-threatening prostate cancers, with up to 92% accuracy. Professor Norman Maitland, from the University of York's Department of Biology, said: "Unnecessary prostate treatment has both physical consequences for patients and their families, [...]

2018-11-06T07:32:36+00:00October 23rd, 2018|

Scientists discover hormone therapy’s impact on prostate cancer

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have discovered how prostate cancer can sometimes withstand and outwit a standard hormone therapy, causing the cancer to spread. Their findings also point to a simple blood test that may help doctors predict when this type of hormone therapy resistance will occur. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men, behind lung cancer, killing nearly 30,000 in the U.S. each year, according to the American Cancer Society. In its early stages, the most common type, adenocarcinoma, is curable and generally responds well to therapies, including those that target androgen -- a male sex hormone that stimulates tumor growth. However, in certain patients, the cancer becomes resistant to androgen-targeted therapy, and the cancer recurs or spreads. One possible reason [...]

2018-09-11T09:01:12+00:00September 11th, 2018|

Eat by 9 p.m. to stave off prostate cancer say researchers

Having an early supper or leaving an interval of at least two hours before going to bed are both associated with a lower risk of breast and prostate cancer. Specifically, people who take their evening meal before 9 pm or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have an approximate 20% lower risk of those types of cancer compared to people who have supper after 10pm or those who eat and go to bed very close afterwards, respectively. These were the main conclusions of a new study by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a center supported by the "la Caixa" Banking Foundation. The study is the first to analyses the association between cancer risk and the timing of meals and [...]

2018-08-07T11:46:52+00:00August 7th, 2018|

Dr. Michael Lazar New Radio Interview on Here’s to Your Health

HIFU is an FDA approved precise and targeted therapy that reduces the risk of complications caused by surgery and radiation. HIFU uses ultrasound energy, or sound waves, to heat and destroy specifically targeted areas of tissue. During HIFU, the sound waves pass through healthy tissue without causing damage. However, at the focal point of the sound waves (like a magnifying glass focusing the rays of the sun to burn a leaf), the tissue temperature is raised to 90 degrees Celsius, destroying the targeted tissue. Men treated with HIFU wake up and go home without pain or bleeding.  They are able to travel the same day, drive the next day, and resume normal activities within a few days.  Those with office based jobs [...]

2018-08-01T08:23:00+00:00August 1st, 2018|