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Prostate Cancer

Common Prostate Cancer Therapy May Trigger Dementia

A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) — a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease — and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Their previous studies have shown men who undergo ADT may be at an increased risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, compared to men who were not treated with the therapy.

This new analysis — the largest of its kind ever performed on this topic — shows that all existing studies taken together support the link to dementia and show a possible link to Alzheimer’s. The findings are published this week in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. “Since publishing our initial findings, there has been a lot of other research on this topic, and we wanted to see what that research was saying,” said the study’s lead author Kevin Nead, MD, MPhil, a resident in Radiation Oncology at Penn. “This analysis tells us that the composite message of existing studies is that androgen deprivation therapy is associated with dementia.”

The team compiled data from four different global databases looking at studies on ADT patients and dementia and Alzheimer’s. An analysis of more than 50,000 patients worldwide showed a consistent statistical link between men who underwent ADT for prostate cancer and men who developed dementia. Nead says the numbers show correlation, not causation at this point, but that there is evidence of a direct connection.

“Research shows androgens play a key role in neuron maintenance and growth, so the longer you undergo this therapy to decrease androgens, the more it may impact the brain’s normal functions,” Nead said.

The analysis was less conclusive on the question of Alzheimer’s. While there was still a connection, it was not as clearly defined as the link to dementia. Nead says evidence for a link between ADT and neurocognitive dysfunction is growing and should be part of the conversation between doctors and patients.

“There’s enough evidence of these links that patients should know about them when considering their options,” Nead said.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

K T Nead, S Sinha, P L Nguyen. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and dementia risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 2017; DOI: 10.1038/pcan.2017.10

Read this on Science Daily: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. “Link between common prostate cancer treatment, dementia detailed in new study: Analysis elaborates on correlation between dementia and testosterone-lowering therapy.” ScienceDaily, 30 March 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170330114954.htm.


HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth #cancerresearch

By | April 4th, 2017|News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Study reveals genetic connection to aggressive prostate cancer

An international study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has identified a genetic connection to the aggressive form of prostate cancer. The study showed a threefold increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer for men with the genetic mutation. The frequency of the gene variants varied from 6 to 14% of the population of men with prostate cancer.

Much like the association between BRCA gene mutation and the risk for breast cancer in women changed the approach to treatment/ prevention, the identification of the Kallikrein 6 gene region may change the course of prostate cancer care through a blood test developed by the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute.

The study was led by Dr. Alexandre Zlotta, Director of Uro-Oncology at Mount Sinai Hospital, and researcher with the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, part of Sinai Health System in Toronto, Canada, and Dr. Paul Boutros, Principal Investigator, Informatics and Bio-computing, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR). The first author of the paper was Dr. Laurent Briollais, Senior Investigator, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute.

These findings are important because it is well established that most men will die with prostate cancer, and not from the disease. Dr. Zlotta was the lead author of a study in 2013 which revealed the unexpected high prevalence of indolent prostate cancer in men. Diagnosing the aggressive form of the disease is an important unmet need.

“As an oncologist I know firsthand how valuable it would be to have a genetic tool that could help choose the best course of action with my patients,” explains Zlotta. “It would help spare patients with indolent disease from unnecessary treatments and their side effects and aid in the diagnosis and directing patients with aggressive disease to the appropriate treatment.” Up until now, no single test could predict the severity of the cancer type- the current PSA test (Kallikrein 3), which is located near Kallikrein 6, only identifies the risk of prostate cancer, not the severity.

To identify the relevant mutations the scientists analyzed the blood samples of 1,858 men from three independent cohorts in Europe and North America: the Swiss arm of the European Randomized Study for Prostate Cancer Screening, the large American Screening trial, Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO), Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (University Health Network) and Mount Sinai Hospital (Sinai Health System) in Toronto. The KLK6 variants also independently predicted treatment failure after surgery or radiation for prostate cancer in an independent cohort of 130 men from the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).


Story Source:

Materials provided by Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laurent Briollais, Hilmi Ozcelik, Jingxiong Xu, Maciej Kwiatkowski, Emilie Lalonde, Dorota H. Sendorek, Neil E. Fleshner, Franz Recker, Cynthia Kuk, Ekaterina Olkhov-Mitsel, Tristan Juvet, Ioannis Prassas, John Trachtenberg, Ants Toi, Michael Fraser, Theodorus van der Kwast, Robert G. Bristow, Bharati Bapat, Eleftherios P. Diamandis, Paul C. Boutros, Alexandre R. Zlotta. Germline Mutations in the Kallikrein 6 Region and Predisposition for Aggressive Prostate Cancer. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2017; 109 (4) DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djw258

Read this article on ScienceDaily:

“Genetic association with aggressive prostate cancer discovered: Study showed a threefold increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer for men with the genetic mutation..” 16 March 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170316141120.htm.

By | March 21st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Researchers target cholesterol to stop prostate cancer

Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem.

Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients.

The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research.

“Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher cholesterol levels than normal cells,” said senior author Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. “All cells need cholesterol to grow, and too much of it can stimulate uncontrolled growth.

“Prostate cancer cells somehow bypass the cellular control switch that regulates the levels of cholesterol allowing them to accumulate this fat,” McDonnell said. “This process has not been well understood. In this study, we show how prostate cancer cells accomplish this.”

McDonnell and colleagues began by identifying genes involved in cholesterol regulation in prostate tumors. They homed in on a specific gene, CYP27A1, which is a key component of the machinery that governs the level of cholesterol within cells.

In patients with prostate cancer, the expression of the CYP27A1 gene in tumors is significantly lower, and this is especially true for men with aggressive cancers compared to the tumors in men with more benign disease. Downregulation of this gene basically shuts off the sensor that cells use to gauge when they have taken up enough cholesterol. This in turn allows accumulation of this fat in tumor cells. Access to more cholesterol gives prostate cancer cells a selective growth advantage.

“It remains to be determined how this regulatory activity can be restored and/or whether it’s possible to mitigate the effects of the increased cholesterol uptake that result from the loss of CYP27A1 expression,” McDonnell said.

He said statin use alone might help, but perhaps not enough, since tumors could simply rev up the regulation of the cholesterol manufacturing process in tumors to compensate.

McDonnell said is lab is continuing the research, including finding ways to induce cells to eject cholesterol, reverse the inhibition of CYP27A1 activity, or introduce compounds that interfere with cholesterol-production in the tumor.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Duke University Medical Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mahmoud A Alfaqih, Erik R Nelson, Wen Liu, Rachid Safi, Jeff S Jasper, Everardo Macias, Joseph Geradts, Laura G Dubois, Will Thompson, Michael R Freeman, Ching-yi Chang, Jen-Tsan Chi, Donald P McDonnell, Stephen J. Freedland. CYP27A1 loss dysregulates cholesterol homeostasis in prostate cancer. Cancer Research, 2017; canres.2738.2016 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-2738

Duke University Medical Center. “Prostate cancer cells grow with malfunction of cholesterol control in cells: Shutting down this source at the root cause could improve cancer survival.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 February 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170221130703.htm.
By | March 1st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New discovery may lead to blood test predicting and preventing prostate cancer spread

University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered a new pathway which regulates the spread of prostate cancer around the body.

Published in the journal Cancer Research, the discovery has potential to lead to the development of a blood test that could predict whether cancer will spread from the prostate tumour to other parts of the body. The research also reveals potential new targets for drugs that may inhibit the spread of cancer.

“Prostate cancers only kill men after they have spread or ‘metastasised’ from the prostate,” says project leader Dr Luke Selth, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide’s Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories and a member of the Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men’s Health.

“The identification of markers that accurately predict, at an early stage, prostate tumours that are likely to metastasise could guide the urgency and aggressiveness of treatment — and this could save lives.”

The international research team — led by the University of Adelaide and including members from the University of Michigan, Vancouver Prostate Centre, the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University — showed that a specific microRNA (a type of molecule involved in regulating the level and activity of genes) called miR-194 promotes cancer metastasis by inhibiting a key protein called SOCS2. SOCS2 can suppress the spread of cancer cells.

“In previous work, we had found that a high level of miR-194 in a patient’s blood was associated with rapid relapse of prostate cancer following surgical removal of the tumour,” says Dr Selth. “This new work explains why miR-194 is associated with a poor outcome, and in the process reveals a completely novel pathway regulating prostate cancer metastasis.

“Importantly, measuring miR-194 in a patient’s blood at the time of diagnosis could become a test for the likelihood of metastasis. Patients with high levels of miR-194 in their blood could receive more aggressive treatment to reduce the chance of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body.” Dr Selth’s team is currently testing this idea using larger patient groups to validate their findings.

Dr Selth says miR-194 also represents a potential therapeutic target. “There are currently no drugs that effectively inhibit the spread of prostate cancer,” he says. “We propose that inhibiting miR-194 could reduce rates of metastasis in patients with aggressive disease, but the development of a drug to achieve this goal is still a long way off.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Rajdeep Das, Phillip A Gregory, Rayzel C Fernandes, Iza Denis, Qingqing Wang, Scott L Townley, Shuang G. Zhao, Adrienne Hanson, Marie A Pickering, Heather K Armstrong, Noor A Lokman, Esmaeil Ebrahimie, Elai Davicioni, Robert B. Jenkins, R. Jeffrey Karnes, Ashley E. Ross, Robert B Den, Eric A. Klein, Kim N. Chi, Hayley S Ramshaw, Elizabeth D Williams, Amina Zoubedi, Gregory J Goodall, Felix Y. Feng, Lisa M. Butler, Wayne D Tilley, Luke A Selth. MicroRNA-194 promotes prostate cancer metastasis by inhibiting SOCS2. Cancer Research, 2016; canres.2529.2016 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-2529

Read this article on ScienceDaily:

University of Adelaide. “Predicting and preventing prostate cancer spread.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125091702.htm.
By | February 21st, 2017|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Prostate Cancer News: Emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment

The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report in a new study.

“Emotional distress may motivate men with low-risk prostate cancer to choose more aggressive treatment, such as choosing surgery over active surveillance,” said UB’s Heather Orom, the lead author on the study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

“It underscores what we have been pushing a long time for, which is, ‘Let’s make this decision as informed and supported as possible.’ If distress early on is influencing treatment choice, then maybe we help men by providing clearer information about prognosis and strategies for dealing with anxiety. We hope this will help improve the treatment decision making process and ultimately, the patient’s quality of life,” added Orom, PhD, associate professor of community health and health behavior in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions.

The study involved 1,531 men with newly diagnosed, clinically localized prostate cancer, meaning the disease hadn’t spread to other parts of the body.

Researchers measured participants’ emotional distress with the Distress Thermometer, an 11-point scale ranging from 0 (no distress) to 10 (extreme distress). The men were assessed after diagnosis and again as soon as they had made their treatment decision.

The majority of study participants had either low- or intermediate-risk disease, and were more likely to have been treated with surgery, followed by radiation and active surveillance.

“Men’s level of emotional distress shortly after diagnosis predicted greater likelihood of choosing surgery over active surveillance,” the researchers report. “Importantly, this was true among men with low-risk disease, for whom active surveillance may be a clinically viable option and side effects of surgery might be avoided.”

While prostate cancer is a major disease in the U.S., it is not a death sentence, according to the American Cancer Society, which estimates there are nearly 3 million prostate cancer survivors alive today.

However, overtreatment is a concern, and surgery and radiation therapy have side effects that include erectile dysfunction and incontinence, which, for the majority of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, can be avoided by instead choosing active surveillance to monitor the cancer and considering treatment if the disease progresses.

“There’s an interest in driving the decision-making experience to prevent overtreatment and ensure that men have full information about all the side effects so they can make a choice that’s preference and value driven,” Orom said. “We don’t want men to make a decision that they’ll regret later on.”

“The goal of most physicians treating men with prostate cancer is to help their patients and family members through a difficult process and help their patients receive appropriate treatment,” said Willie Underwood III, MD, MS, MPH, an associate professor in Roswell Park’s Department of Urology, and a paper co-author.

“To do so, it is helpful for physicians to better understand what is motivating men’s decisions and to address negative motivators such as emotional distress to prevent men from receiving a treatment that they don’t need or will later regret,” Underwood added.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University at Buffalo. Original written by David J. Hill. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Heather Orom, Willie Underwood, Caitlin Biddle. Emotional Distress Increases the Likelihood of Undergoing Surgery among Men with Localized Prostate Cancer. The Journal of Urology, 2017; 197 (2): 350 DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.08.007

Read this article on ScienceDaily: University at Buffalo. “For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170111103920.htm.
By | February 14th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Free HIFU Info Session Scheduled for February

Do you have prostate cancer?

There is now a non-invasive treatment option.

Join Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU for a special Prostate Cancer Treatment Information session scheduled for Thurs., Feb. 16, 2017 at 7 p.m. This free session will be held at the Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95405. Dr. Lazar will discuss how Sonablate HIFU can treat Prostate Cancer with lower risk of side effects such as impotence and incontinence. HIFU is radiation free – provides quick recovery – requires no chemotherapy and no surgery.

Free and open to the public. Call for reservations today Jennifer Radovich 707-546-5553.

Refreshments will be provided.

Brought to you by HIFU Prostate Services and California HIFU.

By | January 31st, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Prostate Cancer Rates Take a Nose Dive Per Latest Statistics

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU, Urologist and Prostate Cancer expert reflects on the latest American Cancer Society statics

The results from the American Cancer Society’s newest report on cancer rates is good news for everyone and particularly good news for prostate cancer patients: incidents of cancer is down as is the likelihood of prostate cancer patients dying from the diagnosis.

According to the report the cancer death rate has dropped from its peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 161.2 in 2014 (per 100K population), the most recent year for which data was available to analyze. Overall the decline in cancer is linked with decreases in smoking and advances in early detection and treatment. The four major cancer drops are:

  • lung (- 43% between 1990 and 2014 among males and -17% between 2002 and 2014 among females)
  • breast (-38% from 1989 to 2014)
  • prostate (-51% from 1993 to 2014)
  • colorectal (-51% from 1976 to 2014)

“This is really exciting news for anyone who specializes in prostate cancer,” says Michael Lazar, M.D. “And its particularly good news for our patients. When a man is diagnosed with cancer, whether it’s prostate cancer or some other cancer – the news is always difficult to accept. With the number of people being diagnosed with prostate cancer dropping steadily along with the expected death rates, patients are now more empowered to be optimistic about their treatment options.”

According to the American Cancer Society, the decline in new cancer rates for men can be attributed to the recent drop in prostate cancer diagnoses. This has to do with the fact that routine screening with the PSA blood test is no longer recommended out of concerns for over-diagnosis and treatment of positive results that are best left untreated. Therefore, fewer cases of prostate cancer are now being detected. But this does not need to lessen the importance of getting screened for prostate cancer when symptoms are apparent.

“Although this is really good news, men who are concerned about prostate cancer, and anyone in the high-risk group still needs to be to screened early and at regular intervals,” says Dr. Lazar. “Once cancer has advanced beyond the prostate gland, available treatment options become more radical.”

The highest risk groups for prostate cancer are men over the age of 50, African-American men, and men who have a father, brother or son who has had prostate cancer.

About Prostate Cancer

Most prostate cancers tend to grow slowly, and don’t cause obvious health problems for men who have received a diagnosis. In certain situations, prostate cancer can be managed conservatively, especially in elderly men. But one treatment that stands out among more invasive options for prostate cancer is High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and it is most effective for men who have been diagnose and are in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, this is one technology that requires vigilance at the early stages when HIFU would be most effective for prostate cancer eradication.

“For patients with prostate cancer, HIFU treatment is most effective in the early stages,” explains Dr. Lazar. “When the cancer is localized to the prostate treatment by HIFU is extremely effective. Unlike other treatments, this procedure preserves healthy tissue and nerves, so urine flow and erectile function is maintained in a high percent of cases, as compared to radical surgery or radiation.”

The oncological results for HIFU is comparable to more traditional prostate cancer treatments including radical surgery or radiation. But the side effects for HIFU patients have proven to be much less debilitating than more radical procedures.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar formed California HIFU to offer minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment to men with the Sonablate.

For more information about HIFU treatment which is now available in San Francisco, or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553. Visit us online to learn more.

 

Researchers unravel genetic codes to determine why inherited prostate cancer is so deadly

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

Canadian and Australian prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

The findings, published online in Nature Communications, show that BRCA2-associated tumours are already pre-set to be aggressive, even before treatment. This is because the genes normally involved in regulating cell growth and division are abnormal in the BRCA2-associated cancers right from the get-go and therefore are resistant to therapy right up front, says co-principal investigator Dr. Robert Bristow, clinician-scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. In the Nature Communications study, Dr. Bristow and co-principal investigators Dr. Paul Boutros at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and Prof.

Gail Risbridger at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, compared 15 patients with BRCA2-inherited prostate cancer with 500 prostate cancer patients from the general population with non-inherited (“sporadic”) prostate cancer. In the related study of 500 tumours from Canadian men with non-inherited prostate cancer also published in Nature, Drs. Bristow and Boutros analyses led to the discovery of a new genetic fingerprint that identifies when curable disease may turn aggressive.Although BRCA2-inherited disease affects less than 2 per cent of men with prostate cancer, Dr. Bristow says the research sets the stage to rethink ways to use other drugs differently to personalize treatment for more men.

“The pathways that we discovered to be abnormal in the localized BRCA2-associated cancers are usually only found in general population cancers when they become resistant to hormone therapy and spread through the body,” says Dr. Bristow. “These include pathways related to the repair of DNA damage, cell division, the receptor for the male hormone testosterone and cell-to-cell signaling. “We now know need to explore the use of novel therapies to offset the BRCA2-associated aggressiveness earlier on in the treatment of these men and improve survival in an otherwise lethal tumour,” he says. “This might include different types of chemotherapy or the use of molecular-targeted drugs that specifically target the changes associated with BRCA2 mutation.”

“This is an exciting time in prostate cancer research in which the genetics of individual men and their cancers are beginning to dictate precise and customized treatment,” he adds. “It is an example of the power of international collaboration and team science to crack the genetic code even in the rarest of tumours.”

See this story on Science Daily: 9 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170109125240.htm
Story Source: Materials provided by University Health Network (UHN). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
By | January 10th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Sonablate HIFU Tissue Change Monitoring

HIFU, which stands for high intensity focused ultrasound is a recently approved new technology for prostate tissue ablation. Many urologists have worked with HIFU for several years to offer their patients a minimally invasive treatment option for prostate cancer, either as a part of a clinical trial or at international treatment centers outside the United States.

There are currently two different medical devices that use HIFU energy to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate. The most technologically advanced HIFU device for prostate cancer is called the Sonablate. The Sonablate is a software directed device that includes a computer console, a transrectal probe and a chilling unit. The Sonablate software that physicians use to plan and execute Sonablate HIFU treatment has state-of-the-art features that make it the safest and most precise HIFU device for prostate disease available.

Using the Sonablate state-of-the-art software physicians obtain real-time images of the prostate that are used to map out and target exactly where HIFU should be delivered. Once treatment plan is mapped, HIFU energy is delivered to those areas.

One of the unique key features that the Sonablate has is called Tissue Change Monitoring, or more simply, TCM.

What is TCM?

The most simple way to explain it is that TCM allows the treating HIFU doctor to monitor changes that happen to the tissue in the prostate after the HIFU energy has been delivered. This monitoring of tissue is important because the doctor will immediately know if enough energy has been delivered to effectively destroy the tissue.

While HIFU is being delivered to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate, physicians have the ability to monitor how the tissue is changing and reacting. The Sonablate gives unique feedback on changes to the tissue so the doctor can monitor exactly what is happening and make adjustments as needed for the best outcomes.

Read the full story here …

High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. Visit our website to learn More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 20th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New study suggests a more accurate system for early detection, treatment of prostate cancer

A new study may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.


New research coauthored by Brigham Young University researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer.

The new study, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details a computer model that uses medical images to reproduce the growth patterns of prostate cancer on the anatomy of a patient’s prostate.

This type of mathematical modeling and simulation of disease (aka predictive medicine) can lead to personalized treatment and more accurate forecasting of clinical outcomes.

“There is a lot of room for improvement in both the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer,” said study coauthor Michael Scott, BYU professor of civil and environmental engineering. “We’re using computer modeling to capture the behavior of prostate tumor growth which will hopefully lead to minimally invasive predictive procedures which can be used in clinical practice.”

Current diagnosis methods include invasive biopsy procedures which too often lead to patients being over-treated or under-treated. Complicating matters is the fact that prostate cancer can remain undiagnosed because early stages of the disease may not produce symptoms until a tumor is either very large or has invaded other tissues.

The new system could lead to both earlier diagnosis and less invasive testing. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.

Scott, and fellow BYU professor Kevin Tew teamed up with colleagues at the University of Coruna, UT-Austin and Carnegie Mellon for the study. The personalized tumor growth simulations leveraged the high-performance computing resources available through BYU’s Fulton Supercomputing Lab.

Scott said the research is still in its infancy and extensive validation and refinement of the model must occur before it is ready for clinical application. That said, “it’s likely that these types of models will eventually turn up in medical practice,” he added.

“We are entering an age where we will see the emergence of tools which leverage computation to improve diagnosis of disease,” Scott said. “And we’re not the only people working in this area — it’s rapidly growing.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by Brigham Young University. Original written by Todd Hollingshead. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Read on ScienceDaily: Brigham Young University. “Computer modeling could lead to new method for detecting, managing prostate cancer.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161122080748.htm.


High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. HIFU is most effective for patients with early stage prostate cancer where the cancer is localized to the prostate. Visit our website to learn more: http://www.californiahifu.com/ #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 6th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments