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Prostate Cancer

Researchers unravel genetic codes to determine why inherited prostate cancer is so deadly

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

Canadian and Australian prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

The findings, published online in Nature Communications, show that BRCA2-associated tumours are already pre-set to be aggressive, even before treatment. This is because the genes normally involved in regulating cell growth and division are abnormal in the BRCA2-associated cancers right from the get-go and therefore are resistant to therapy right up front, says co-principal investigator Dr. Robert Bristow, clinician-scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. In the Nature Communications study, Dr. Bristow and co-principal investigators Dr. Paul Boutros at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, and Prof.

Gail Risbridger at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, compared 15 patients with BRCA2-inherited prostate cancer with 500 prostate cancer patients from the general population with non-inherited (“sporadic”) prostate cancer. In the related study of 500 tumours from Canadian men with non-inherited prostate cancer also published in Nature, Drs. Bristow and Boutros analyses led to the discovery of a new genetic fingerprint that identifies when curable disease may turn aggressive.Although BRCA2-inherited disease affects less than 2 per cent of men with prostate cancer, Dr. Bristow says the research sets the stage to rethink ways to use other drugs differently to personalize treatment for more men.

“The pathways that we discovered to be abnormal in the localized BRCA2-associated cancers are usually only found in general population cancers when they become resistant to hormone therapy and spread through the body,” says Dr. Bristow. “These include pathways related to the repair of DNA damage, cell division, the receptor for the male hormone testosterone and cell-to-cell signaling. “We now know need to explore the use of novel therapies to offset the BRCA2-associated aggressiveness earlier on in the treatment of these men and improve survival in an otherwise lethal tumour,” he says. “This might include different types of chemotherapy or the use of molecular-targeted drugs that specifically target the changes associated with BRCA2 mutation.”

“This is an exciting time in prostate cancer research in which the genetics of individual men and their cancers are beginning to dictate precise and customized treatment,” he adds. “It is an example of the power of international collaboration and team science to crack the genetic code even in the rarest of tumours.”

See this story on Science Daily: 9 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170109125240.htm
Story Source: Materials provided by University Health Network (UHN). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
By | January 10th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Sonablate HIFU Tissue Change Monitoring

HIFU, which stands for high intensity focused ultrasound is a recently approved new technology for prostate tissue ablation. Many urologists have worked with HIFU for several years to offer their patients a minimally invasive treatment option for prostate cancer, either as a part of a clinical trial or at international treatment centers outside the United States.

There are currently two different medical devices that use HIFU energy to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate. The most technologically advanced HIFU device for prostate cancer is called the Sonablate. The Sonablate is a software directed device that includes a computer console, a transrectal probe and a chilling unit. The Sonablate software that physicians use to plan and execute Sonablate HIFU treatment has state-of-the-art features that make it the safest and most precise HIFU device for prostate disease available.

Using the Sonablate state-of-the-art software physicians obtain real-time images of the prostate that are used to map out and target exactly where HIFU should be delivered. Once treatment plan is mapped, HIFU energy is delivered to those areas.

One of the unique key features that the Sonablate has is called Tissue Change Monitoring, or more simply, TCM.

What is TCM?

The most simple way to explain it is that TCM allows the treating HIFU doctor to monitor changes that happen to the tissue in the prostate after the HIFU energy has been delivered. This monitoring of tissue is important because the doctor will immediately know if enough energy has been delivered to effectively destroy the tissue.

While HIFU is being delivered to heat and destroy tissue in the prostate, physicians have the ability to monitor how the tissue is changing and reacting. The Sonablate gives unique feedback on changes to the tissue so the doctor can monitor exactly what is happening and make adjustments as needed for the best outcomes.

Read the full story here …

High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. Visit our website to learn More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 20th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New study suggests a more accurate system for early detection, treatment of prostate cancer

A new study may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.


New research coauthored by Brigham Young University researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer.

The new study, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details a computer model that uses medical images to reproduce the growth patterns of prostate cancer on the anatomy of a patient’s prostate.

This type of mathematical modeling and simulation of disease (aka predictive medicine) can lead to personalized treatment and more accurate forecasting of clinical outcomes.

“There is a lot of room for improvement in both the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer,” said study coauthor Michael Scott, BYU professor of civil and environmental engineering. “We’re using computer modeling to capture the behavior of prostate tumor growth which will hopefully lead to minimally invasive predictive procedures which can be used in clinical practice.”

Current diagnosis methods include invasive biopsy procedures which too often lead to patients being over-treated or under-treated. Complicating matters is the fact that prostate cancer can remain undiagnosed because early stages of the disease may not produce symptoms until a tumor is either very large or has invaded other tissues.

The new system could lead to both earlier diagnosis and less invasive testing. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.

Scott, and fellow BYU professor Kevin Tew teamed up with colleagues at the University of Coruna, UT-Austin and Carnegie Mellon for the study. The personalized tumor growth simulations leveraged the high-performance computing resources available through BYU’s Fulton Supercomputing Lab.

Scott said the research is still in its infancy and extensive validation and refinement of the model must occur before it is ready for clinical application. That said, “it’s likely that these types of models will eventually turn up in medical practice,” he added.

“We are entering an age where we will see the emergence of tools which leverage computation to improve diagnosis of disease,” Scott said. “And we’re not the only people working in this area — it’s rapidly growing.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by Brigham Young University. Original written by Todd Hollingshead. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Read on ScienceDaily: Brigham Young University. “Computer modeling could lead to new method for detecting, managing prostate cancer.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161122080748.htm.


High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. HIFU is most effective for patients with early stage prostate cancer where the cancer is localized to the prostate. Visit our website to learn more: http://www.californiahifu.com/ #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth

By | December 6th, 2016|HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

One year following FDA approval California HIFU is Giving Prostate Cancer Patients Hope for a Healthy Future

Santa Rosa Urologist Dr. Michael Lazar celebrates California HIFU’s first anniversary with look back at October 2015 when HIFU received approval from Food and Drug Administration for use in the U.S.

High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technology that targets cancer cells with precision in a one to four-hour procedure that has little or no side effects, provides a remarkably quick recovery rate, and gives men diagnosed with prostate cancer a less invasive option over surgery or radiation.

“The oncological results for HIFU is comparable to more traditional prostate cancer treatments including radical surgery or radiation. But the side effects for HIFU patients have proven to be much less debilitating than more radical procedures,” says Dr. Lazar. “For example, if the HIFU procedure is performed in the morning, a patient is typically ambulatory by dinnertime and can often return to normal activity within a few days without the use of pain-killers.”

HIFU Background

Sonablate was the first focused ultrasound ablation device to receive regulatory authorization from the FDA for prostate cancer. Although relatively new to the U.S. Sonablate® technology has been used around the world on more than 15,000 patients in over 30 countries for 15 years. Approximately 4,000 U.S. men have received HIFU treatment outside the U.S. prior to FDA approval.

Recognizing its potential as a less invasive treatment option with the ability to eliminate prostate cancer while preserving patient quality of life, Dr. Lazar became one of the early advocates for HIFU. Once fully trained in the technology, he began treating U.S. prostate cancer patients in Mexico beginning in 2007. He performed outpatient procedures at a U.S. Joint Commission approved bilingual hospital in Mexico – helping to bring this innovative prostate cancer treatment to hundreds of men diagnosed with the disease. During that time Dr. Lazar also served as a HIFU instructor for other physicians and is now actively training doctors in San Francisco.

Immediately following FDA approval in 2015, HIFU Prostate Services (HPS) became the first company to establish centers in the United States offering Sonablate HIFU technology to prostate cancer patients. Serving as Medical Director for HPS Dr. Lazar simultaneously founded California HIFU to provide HIFU services in the San Francisco area, the first such facility on the west coast. Since that time HIFU using Sonablate® technology has become available in more than 40 locations across the nation.

How Patients Respond to HIFU

https://youtu.be/oNt1g6p5nOE

Dr. Lazar’s HIFU Patients Share Their Experiences

For patients with prostate cancer, HIFU treatment is most effective in the early stages, where it is localized to the prostate. It is performed on an out-patient basis in just a few hours. The procedure preserves healthy tissue and nerves, so urine flow and erectile function is maintained in a high percent of cases, as compared to radical surgery or radiation.

Several of Dr. Lazar’s HIFU patients recently came together to tell their stories and to share their personal experience with prostate cancer in a poignant new video titled California HIFU Patient Stories video. “The biggest benefit of HIFU for me was lack of risk compared to the other options,” says one patient. The results “have been exactly as Dr. Lazar described it to me,” another patient says. “I think I would be a much more crippled individual with other forms of treatment,” says another, adding “…. there’s very little worry involved in this procedure.” For more patient stories visit the California HIFU YouTube channel.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Lazar is part of Northern California Medical Associates and operates California HIFU in Santa Rosa. He is the medical director of HIFU Prostate Services, LLC, a leading provider of minimally-invasive prostate cancer treatments using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Dr. Lazar is also a clinical partner with HPS with the HIFU San Francisco Surgery Center of Excellence, a state-of-the-art facility that is convenient to hotels and the airport.  For more information about Dr. Lazar, HIFU treatment for prostate cancer visit the HIFU website or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

Researchers discover three novel intrinsic subtypes of prostate cancer

pipet-1440965In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Findings represent a step toward the implementation of personalized medicine in prostate cancer care.

To diagnose and determine treatment for prostate cancer, clinicians consider many factors, including a digital rectal exam, the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level in a patient’s blood and prostate tumor biopsy results. Molecular subtyping of tumor cells allows oncologists to individualize care and tailor treatment based on the actual biology of each patient’s individual disease.

“Tumors that appear similar under a microscope can behave very differently, from a clinical standpoint,” said Daniel E. Spratt, MD, lead author of the study and Chief of the Genitourinary Radiotherapy Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “One promise of genomic analyses is to elucidate subtypes of cancer based on the genetics of the tumor rather than merely how they look or what size they are.”

To identify genomic profiles for prostate cancer, researchers analyzed RNA expression patterns in 4,236 samples from nine separate groups of men treated with radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. In an effort to create “intrinsic” subtypes specific to the cancer itself rather than the associated surrounding tissue, data were refined to remove non-tumor genes from the training (i.e., identification not validation) dataset. Through K-median clustering analysis, researchers identified three molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that could be characterized through a profile of 100 distinct genes, named the Prostate Cancer 100 (PC100) by study investigators.

“We were surprised to find that prostate cancer subtyped into only three very distinct subtypes,” said Dr. Spratt. “We knew that primary prostate cancer was a relatively quiet tumor, genomically, but similar cancers that are endocrine-driven, like breast cancer, have been shown to be able to be clustered into a finite number of subtypes.”

Researchers validated the subtypes across six additional retrospective cohorts, representing a variety of RNA sequencing platforms and tissue storage methods, and two prospective cohorts comprising 2,610 patients. The intrinsic subtypes were associated with androgen receptor (AR) activity, expression of the ERG oncogene and other known drivers of prostate tumor growth and progression, but researchers did not find a link from mutations or genetic rearrangements to the subtypes.

Rates of distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) at ten years varied significantly among the three subtype groups. DMFS rates were 57.1 percent for subtype A, 64.4 percent for subtype B, and 73.6 percent for subtype C (B vs. A: Cox Hazard Ratio (HR), 1.31, p = 0.02; C vs. A: HR, 1.65, p = 0.0001). After controlling for clinocopathologic variables, the profile remained independently associated with DMFS (B vs. A: Cox HR, 1.31, p = 0.026; C vs. A: HR, 1.33, p = 0.024). Additionally, multivariate interaction analysis determined that subtypes B and C shared a significant correlation with response to post-operative radiation therapy (RT) (Wald p = 0.0016).

“We have discovered and independently validated a highly stable 100-gene intrinsic molecular profile of prostate cancer that is both prognostic and predictive for radiation therapy,” said Dr. Spratt. “We believe that these subtypes reflect truly distinctive underlying biology and that this work represents a significant advance in our understanding of prostate cancer biology. Moreover, our findings identify numerous genes and enriched biologically active pathways in prostate cancer that have been underappreciated to date but may be potential targets to improve cure rates in this disease by developing new targeted therapies.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). “Three novel intrinsic subtypes of prostate cancer identified.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160926100610.htm.
By | November 1st, 2016|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Researchers say genomic fingerprinting important for treating prostate cancer

While the majority of prostate cancers are slow growing and not fatal, some are aggressive and lethal. Genomic fingerprinting can help predict a tumor’s aggressiveness and tailor treatment plans; however, in the majority of cases involving multiple prostate tumors, only the largest tumor is typically fingerprinted — resulting in more aggressive tumors potentially going undetected.

Writing in the journal European Urology, a research team led by Hannelore Heemers, Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute Department of Cancer Biology, and James Mohler, M.D., chair of the Department of Urology at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, has demonstrated that when genomic fingerprinting is performed on only a single tumor sample, a smaller but more aggressive tumor could potentially be missed.

The finding underscores the importance of new evidence that prostate tumors can be genetically different within an individual patient, which carries important implications for patients and oncologists.

For the study, “Intratumoral and Intertumoral Genomic Heterogeneity of Multifocal Localized Prostate Cancer Impacts Molecular Classifications and Genomic Prognosticators,” the team used next-generation sequencing techniques to genotype prostate tumors from four men who underwent radical prostatectomy at Roswell Park. They also examined public data from the Cancer Genome Atlas to confirm their findings.

“We examined the molecular composition of heterogeneous cancerous tumors in a patient’s prostate. We found a lot of genetic differences among these tumors, and concluded that information from a single cancer biopsy is not sufficient to guide treatment decisions,” said Dr. Heemers. “Precise treatment is more complicated and the findings demonstrate a weakness in current genetic fingerprinting in prostate cancer.”

“High risk prostate cancers differ genetically among patients, among the different tumors within an individual patient and even within different sections of a single tumor,” said Dr. Mohler. “Clinicians need to be careful about using the information from a gene-based test, because the analysis may not have been performed on the most aggressive portion of a man’s prostate cancer.”

In “Disrupting the Status Quo in Prostate Cancer Diagnosis,” an editorial published in the same journal, Alastair David Lamb, MB.ChB., Ph.D., of Cambridge University Hospitals, and co-authors write: “Several aspects of this study are impressive. [The authors] addressed an important clinical and molecular question: What effect does tumor heterogeneity have on decision making in prostate cancer, specifically, with respect to molecular taxonomies of the disease?”

The study authors note that the use of genomic analysis to personalize treatment plans is in its infancy and that many more large studies will be required to develop next-generation prognostic tools that can be relied on to guide treatment selection and planning for men with prostate cancer.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Cleveland Clinic. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Source: “One single biopsy not sufficient to guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer, say researchers.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 September 2016.

About California HIFU

High-intensity focused ultrasound or HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553 or visit our website: www.californiahifu.com

By | October 4th, 2016|News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New trial results encourage patients to weigh long-term impact of treatment options with their doctors

(Published on ScienceDaily – September 15, 2016)

In light of the findings from the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) would like to congratulate the authors and investigators for conceiving and completing a difficult clinical trial to randomize care for 2,664 men who volunteered to be a part of this study. Their paper emphasizes the importance of joint decision making between prostate cancer patients and their physicians when weighing treatment options for early stage disease. Findings from the ProtecT trial can help patients understand the full range of approaches to manage their disease, including the risks and benefits of active monitoring versus early treatment with radiation therapy (RT) or surgery.

Ten-year findings from the trial indicate that for men with early stage prostate cancer, there is no difference in mortality rates following active monitoring, surgery or RT, and moreover, that cancer-specific deaths at ten years following diagnosis averaged only one percent for all men enrolled in the trial.

Growth of the cancer outside of the prostate did vary between monitoring and treatment groups. Rates of both regional spread and distant metastases were significantly higher for men who were monitored rather than treated for their early stage disease. Progression did not vary, however, between the surgery and RT groups, although patients in the trial reported different side effects with each modality.

“These findings underscore the essential role of dialogue in treatment selection,” said ASTRO President David C. Beyer, MD, FASTRO. “Men with prostate cancer are all different, and the relative costs and benefits associated with the multiple options to treat it can vary substantially between individuals. The best treatment decisions for prostate cancer, or any cancer, take into consideration the specifics of each individual patient’s disease, expectations and preferences. These options can be confusing, and patients should always make these decisions after consultation with a radiation oncologist and urologist”

ASTRO, the American Urological Association (AUA) and the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) are currently developing updated guidelines for the management of clinically localized prostate cancer. The recommendations, which update a 2007 collaborative guideline issued by the societies, are scheduled for publication in mid-2017.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

By | September 20th, 2016|Dr. Michael Lazar, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Obesity and a high-fat diet promote prostate cancer progression

Metabolites from a fatty diet join forces with the cancer-driving gene MYC to reprogram prostate cancer cells to grow faster, finds new study. This discovery solidifies a direct link between obesity and lethal prostate cancer.

your-questions-answeredAt the 2016 Annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Conference, Giorgia Zadra, PhD, of the Harvard: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, presented results from a study that helped to clarify the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer.

The skinny? Fat increases the activity of a critical cancer-driving gene called MYC.

Cancer is a greedy disease. Tumors plunder the body’s resources – vitamins and nutrients, energy and oxygen, and vital space as tumors grow to ultimately cause lethal damage. Worst of all, cancer steals precious time away from patients and their loved ones.

It follows then, that having a high-fat diet may be like pouring fuel on the fire, by providing cancer cells with even more of the resources they need. In fact, a number of recent population studies have linked obesity and a high-fat diet with an increased risk for advanced, lethal prostate cancer, especially among African-American men. Unfortunately, the exact biological reasons behind this phenomenon have remained elusive.

Investigating this important question required the intersection of four distinct fields of study: dietary metabolism, “epigenetics” (a mechanism of gene regulation), the biology of cancer-causing genes, and public health sciences.

To develop a comprehensive understanding of how obesity and a high-fat diet promote prostate cancer progression, Zadra, who studies cancer cell metabolism, teamed up with Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Young Investigator David P. Labbé, PhD, of the Harvard: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who studies the regulation of gene expression in healthy and malignant cells by epigenetics.  Read the full story …

HIFU with the Sonablate® 500 has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

By | July 5th, 2016|Dr. Michael Lazar, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Mayo Clinic: Tips on Prostate cancer prevention

There’s no proven prostate cancer prevention strategy. But one way to reduce the risk of prostate cancer is by making healthy choices, such as exercising and eating a healthy diet. Study results often conflict with each other and most studies aren’t designed to definitively prove whether something prevents prostate cancer. As a result, no clear ways to prevent prostate cancer have emerged.

In general, doctors recommend that men with an average risk of prostate cancer make choices that benefit their overall health if they’re interested in prostate cancer prevention.

Choose a healthy diet

There is some evidence that choosing a healthy diet that’s low in fat and full of fruits and vegetables may contribute to a lower risk of prostate cancer, though this hasn’t been proved concretely.

good-food-1328410

Choose a low-fat diet. Foods that contain fats include meats, nuts, oils and dairy products, such as milk and cheese.

In some studies, men who ate the highest amount of fat each day had an increased risk of prostate cancer. While this association doesn’t prove that excess fat causes prostate cancer, reducing the amount of fat you eat each day has other proven benefits, such as helping you control your weight and helping your heart.

To reduce the amount of fat you eat each day, limit fatty foods or choose low-fat varieties. For instance, reduce the amount of fat you add to foods when cooking, select leaner cuts of meat, and choose low-fat or reduced-fat dairy products.

Read the full story here …

HIFU with the Sonablate® 500 has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

By | June 28th, 2016|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

New Study: PSA levels in younger men might predict future risk of prostate cancer

mountain-bikers-in-brazil-1-1433086Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been shown to reduce death and the spread of prostate cancer to other parts of the body, but the PSA test remains highly controversial as it frequently leads to over diagnosis and over treatment of men who may not be at risk.

Smarter screening strategies that can improve the accuracy of diagnosing lethal prostate cancer are urgently needed. Through a prospective study of US men, investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have found that measuring PSA levels in younger men (between the ages of 40 and 59) could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer later in life. Their findings suggest that screening PSA levels in men at mid-life may help identify those who are at greater risk and should be monitored more closely.

“We found a single baseline PSA-level measurement during midlife could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer,” said co-lead author Mark Preston, MD, MPH, a physician in BWH’s Division of Urology. “These data identify subgroups of men, based on their PSA levels at a given age, who could benefit from screening intervals tailored to their actual magnitude of risk.”

Read the full story here …

Dr. Michael Lazar, a Santa Rosa urologist and prostate cancer expert, is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar now offers a HIFU Program in partnership with HIFU Prostate Services, LLC (HPS). HIFU Prostate Services, LLC (HPS) is a leading provider of minimally-invasive prostate cancer treatments using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU prostate treatments are performed at San Francisco Surgery Center (SFSC). SFSC offers patients a state-of-the-art facility that is convenient to hotels and the airport. For more answers on HIFU visit this page ...  For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

By | June 21st, 2016|News, Prostate Cancer, Urology|0 Comments