Research

Blocking prostate cancer cells metabolism with drug therapy may inhibit growth

For years, attempts have been made to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation of cancer cells: they need metabolites to grow and proliferate as much as a vehicle needs gasoline or electricity to move. However, until now it was not known which metabolites cancer cells actually need. A team of researchers from the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR) at the Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences) led by Prof. Andrea Alimonti has identified one of the mechanisms behind this process, as published in a recent article in the journal Nature Genetics. From a theory dating back to the early 20th century by Nobel Prize laureate Otto Warburg, it has been believed that, in order to support their growth, cancer cells needed [...]

2018-02-13T09:06:03+00:00 February 13th, 2018|

Cancerous tissue discernible from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients

Using nuclear medicine, researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research demonstrates that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans correlates with PSMA-expression in primary prostate cancer. By this means, researchers were able to generate an SUVmax cutoff for the differentiation of cancerous and benign prostate tissue. Using nuclear medicine, German researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research is highlighted in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. According to the American Cancer Society, one in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. Early diagnosis is key to successful treatment. The new [...]

2018-02-06T08:27:54+00:00 February 6th, 2018|

How diabetes affects prostate cancer prognosis

Men with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. This could explain why patients with diabetes have a poorer prognosis for prostate cancer. Men with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) from Tübingen and experts of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Urology Department of Tübingen University Hospital were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms [...]

2018-02-01T08:03:09+00:00 February 1st, 2018|

New study shows that some cases of aggressive prostate cancer may be linked to high-fat diet

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU shares insights from a new study on prostate cancer, emphasizing that a healthy diet may contribute to prevention of the disease. There have been many discoveries recently that identify a link between a diet rich in fatty foods and increased risk of prostate cancer. The evidence continues to mount with the results of this new study investigating the effects of high-fat diets on certain prostate cancer tumors. Researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) discovered genetic mechanisms that promote cancer tumor metastasis, pointing to the typical Western high-fat diet as a key factor in driving that metastasis. The study was published this week in two journals; Nature Genetic and Nature Communications. It compared [...]

2018-01-23T09:50:13+00:00 January 23rd, 2018|