Research

HIFU for prostate cancer offers better outcomes for life

Using high energy ultrasound beams to destroy prostate cancer tumors shown to be as effective as surgery or radiotherapy, but with fewer side effects. A study, carried out at six hospitals across the UK, tracked 625 men with prostate cancer who received a type of treatment called high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The research is the largest ever study of HIFU treatment used to target prostate tumors. The treatment is similar to a 'lumpectomy' for other cancers -- where doctors remove only tumor cells, leaving as much healthy tissue as possible. The findings, from a number of institutions including Imperial College London and University College London, found that after five years the cancer survival rate from HIFU was 100 per cent. Approximately, 1 in 10 [...]

2019-04-16T09:01:00-07:00April 16th, 2019|

United States sees the biggest drop in prostate cancer rate

Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are decreasing or stabilizing in most parts of the world, with the United States recording the biggest drop in incidence, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. Despite the trend toward declining or stabilizing rates, prostate cancer remains the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the sixth leading cause of cancer death among men worldwide, said the study's lead author, MaryBeth Freeman, MPH, senior associate scientist, Surveillance Research, at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta. "Previous studies have indicated significant variation in prostate cancer rates, due to factors including detection practices, availability of treatment, and genetic factors," Freeman said. "By comparing rates from different countries, we can assess differences in detection practices [...]

2019-04-09T08:34:29-07:00April 9th, 2019|

Prostate cancer cells change the behavior of healthy cells

Prostate cancer cells change the behavior of other cells around them, including normal cells, by 'spitting out' a protein from their nucleus, new research has found. The tiny pieces of protein are taken up by the other cells, provoking changes that promote tumor growth and -- the researchers believe -- help the cancer hide from the body's immune system. The process has been captured for the first time on video (https://youtu.be/Ye4t9IJpRdo) by researchers at the University of Bradford and University of Surrey. The research is published today [26 March] in Scientific Reports. Lead researcher, Professor Richard Morgan from the University of Bradford, said: "For tumors to survive, grow bigger and spread they need to control the behavior of cancer cells and the normal cells [...]

2019-04-02T10:05:10-07:00April 2nd, 2019|

Compounds in coffee may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer

For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer. This is a pilot study, carried out on drug-resistant cancer cells in cell culture and in a mouse model; it has not yet been tested in humans. This work is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona, after publication in the peer-reviewed journal The Prostate. Coffee is a complex mixture of compounds which has been shown to influence human health in both positive and negative ways. There is increasing evidence that drinking certain types of coffee is associated with a reduction in incidence of some cancers, including prostate cancers. Now Japanese scientists have studied the effects of two compounds found in coffee, [...]

2019-03-19T08:36:47-07:00March 19th, 2019|

Active surveillance nearly tripled in men with low-risk prostate disease

Many men with low-risk prostate cancer who most likely previously would have undergone immediate surgery or radiation are now adopting a more conservative "active surveillance" strategy, according to an analysis of a new federal database by scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The use of active surveillance increased from 14.5 percent to 42.1 percent of men with low-risk prostate cancer between 2010 and 2015, said the researchers, led by Brandon Mahal, MD, from the department of radiation oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center who led the study published by JAMA. During that same period, the percentage of men undergoing radical prostatectomy (removal of the prostate gland) declined from 47.4 percent to 31.3 percent. The use of radiotherapy for low-risk disease dropped from 38.0 percent [...]

2019-02-12T11:42:12-07:00February 12th, 2019|

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancer

A new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. There is considerable debate surrounding the value of prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, and the 2012 United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against PSA testing lies at the center of this debate. This recommendation was made in part due to the potential harms -- such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence -- associated with the treatment of clinically insignificant prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy or radiation. To examine the [...]

2019-01-15T11:04:18-07:00January 15th, 2019|

Study finds needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research, which is published in the January edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. Researchers say that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations. "We have discovered new molecular markers that can help guide men in their decisions about the course of their prostate cancer care," says George Vasmatzis, [...]

2019-01-08T11:03:52-07:00January 8th, 2019|

Excess body weight contributes to aggressive prostate cancer risk

Researchers look at differences between states with the highest and lowest proportions of cancers attributable to excess body weight A new study looking at the share of cancers related to obesity finds an at least 1.5-fold difference between states with the highest and lowest proportions. The proportion of cancer cases that could be attributable to excess body weight ranged from a high of 8.3% in the District of Columbia to a low of 5.9% in Hawaii, reflecting variations in obesity rates in the states. The study appears in JAMA Oncology. Excess body weight is an established cause of cancer, currently known to be linked to 13 cancers. While differences in excess body weight among states in the United States are well-known, there is little [...]

2019-01-02T10:35:55-07:00January 2nd, 2019|

Study discovers link between inflammatory bowel disease and prostate cancer

. Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, reports a 20-year study from Northwestern Medicine. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk of potentially dangerous prostate cancer. About 1 million men have inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S. Inflammatory bowel disease is a common chronic condition that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. "These patients may need to be screened more carefully than a man without inflammatory bowel disease," said lead study author Dr. Shilajit Kundu. "If a man with inflammatory bowel disease has an elevated PSA, it may be an [...]

2018-12-11T08:37:12-07:00December 11th, 2018|

New study looks to determine type of prostate cancer — dangerous or manageable

Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy. A recent study showed that more than 25 men were being unnecessarily treated with surgery or radiotherapy, for every single life saved. It is believed that success rates could be hindered as a result of treating all prostate cancers in the same way. A team at the University of York and the University of British Columbia, Canada, however, have designed a test that can pick out life-threatening prostate cancers, with up to 92% accuracy. Professor Norman Maitland, from the University of York's Department of Biology, said: "Unnecessary prostate treatment has both physical consequences for patients and their families, [...]

2018-11-20T07:52:53-07:00November 20th, 2018|