cancer

New biopsy technology may identify better course of treatment for prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in men worldwide, according to 2012 numbers. While several viable treatment options for prostate cancer exist, many men affected with prostate cancer will not respond to first-line treatments. Researchers in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto have developed a new technology for liquid biopsy to identify which patients may not respond to standard therapy before it is delivered. "Screening for drug resistance is key to improving treatment approaches for many cancers," said Shana Kelley, scientist and professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto. "It's important for patients not to be on a [...]

2018-04-24T10:27:34+00:00 April 24th, 2018|

Blocking prostate cancer cells metabolism with drug therapy may inhibit growth

For years, attempts have been made to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation of cancer cells: they need metabolites to grow and proliferate as much as a vehicle needs gasoline or electricity to move. However, until now it was not known which metabolites cancer cells actually need. A team of researchers from the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR) at the Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences) led by Prof. Andrea Alimonti has identified one of the mechanisms behind this process, as published in a recent article in the journal Nature Genetics. From a theory dating back to the early 20th century by Nobel Prize laureate Otto Warburg, it has been believed that, in order to support their growth, cancer cells needed [...]

2018-02-13T09:06:03+00:00 February 13th, 2018|

Researchers target cholesterol to stop prostate cancer

Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem. Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients. The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research. "Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher cholesterol levels than normal cells," said senior author Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. "All cells [...]

2017-03-01T10:01:29+00:00 March 1st, 2017|