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New blood test better at predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

A new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease. By identifying molecular changes in the PSA protein, the findings of this study suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may reduce the need for biopsy, and may lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.

A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.

By identifying molecular changes in the prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein, the findings, published online last month by European Urology, suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.

The research team, led by Cleveland Clinic’s Eric Klein, M.D., conducted a multi center prospective study of 261 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at five academic and community centers in the U.S. enrolled between August 2015 and December 2016.

“Despite criticism, PSA has transformed the landscape of early detection, screening, and management of prostate cancer in the last few decades,” said Dr. Klein, chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute. “Unfortunately, PSA is tissue-specific but not cancer-specific, leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment of biologically insignificant cancers, which is widely recognized as a key limitation in its clinical utility.”

The study directly compared the clinical performance of a new test based on PSA, called IsoPSA, to PSA itself with patients already scheduled for prostate biopsy. IsoPSA proved significantly superior to PSA in two key indications: discriminating between prostate cancer and benign conditions; and identifying patients with high-grade disease. The former indication is potentially useful for using IsoPSA for screening by primary care physicians, while the second is helpful for urologists in identifying patients who would benefit from curative intent therapy and other applications.

The results show that if validated and adopted clinically, IsoPSA could significantly reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies by almost 50 percent. “The methodology used in the IsoPSA assay represents a significant departure from conventional ways to define biomarkers in blood, and may be applicable to improving other cancer biomarkers,” said Dr. Klein.

“Due to its inherent simplicity, requiring only a blood draw and presenting information to the physician in familiar context using a single number — just like PSA itself — we are quite hopeful in IsoPSA’s future utility after further validation studies,” said Mark Stovsky, M.D., co-author and staff member, Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute.


Story Source: Materials provided by Cleveland Clinic.

Journal Reference: Eric A. Klein, Arnon Chait, Jason M. Hafron, Kenneth M. Kernen, Kannan Manickam, Andrew J. Stephenson, Mathew Wagner, Hui Zhu, Aimee Kestranek, Boris Zaslavsky, Mark Stovsky. The Single-parameter, Structure-based IsoPSA Assay Demonstrates Improved Diagnostic Accuracy for Detection of Any Prostate Cancer and High-grade Prostate Cancer Compared to a Concentration-based Assay of Total Prostate-specific Antigen: A Preliminary Repo. European Urology, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.eururo.2017.03.025

Read this article on Science Daily. “New blood test is more accurate in predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA: IsoPSA assay can help in determining the need for prostate biopsy for patients.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170515122149.htm.

By | May 16th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, HIFU, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Doctors believe it’s important to discuss pros and cons of prostate cancer screening with patients

A new study finds that while a blood test that helps to screen for prostate cancer remains common, only 30 percent of men in a large national survey reported having a balanced discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the screening with their doctor. Moreover, having such a discussion of both pros and cons has become less likely since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation against performing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in 2012.

“That only about a third of patients reported having a discussion of advantages and disadvantages is an alarming statistic,” said study lead author Dr. George Turini III, clinical instructor in medical science at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a urologist with the Southcoast Physician Group.

Co-author Dr. Joseph Renzulli, associate professor of surgery and a urologist at the Minimally Invasive Urology Institute at Miriam Hospital, added, “The concept of ‘shared decision making’ for prostate cancer screening is not occurring in the community.”

For example, in 2014 out of a sample of 111,241 men who responded to the national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, 29.5 percent reported discussing both advantages and disadvantages, 33.9 percent discussed neither, 35.7 percent reported discussing only advantages of PSA, and 0.8 percent reported discussing only disadvantages. In data from 2012, before the task force made its recommendation against the test, out of 105,812 men who responded to the survey, 30.1 percent discussed both, 30.5 percent discussed neither, 38.5 percent discussed only advantages, and 0.8 percent discussed only disadvantages.

Meanwhile, 63.0 percent of the men in 2012 had PSA tests, as did 62.4 percent of the men in 2014, according to the study published online in the journal Urology. In each year thousands of men had the test without having a discussion of how it could either benefit them, for instance via early detection of cancer, or lead to unnecessary adversity, such as a side effects from biopsy or unneeded treatment. They either got no information or only one side of the story.

In addition, the researchers found, men who have low incomes, did not finish high school, lack insurance, or are Hispanic were significantly less likely than men overall to report hearing about the pros and cons of screening via the PSA test, the study found.

“The most vulnerable men are getting less counseling,” said co-author Annie Gjelsvik, assistant professor of epidemiology in the Brown University School of Public Health.

A controversial topic

The PSA test reveals blood levels of a protein naturally secreted by the prostate. Levels could become elevated for a number of reasons including the normal enlargement of the prostate as men age, Turini said. But cancer could also elevate them.

When the task force in 2012 discouraged PSA testing, Turini said, it was because there are risks to what follows from screening. If cancer is suspected, it can only be confirmed with a biopsy and that could cause problems such as infection, bleeding or discomfort.

Beyond those concerns, if prostate cancer is confirmed, the risks inherent in treatment options such as surgery, radiation or hormonal alteration, can be “truly life altering,” he said.

“In some cases, a low volume of less aggressive prostate cancer may not necessitate treatment, but even in those cases where a ‘treatment’ is not performed in favor of active surveillance, the emotional distress of a cancer diagnosis shouldn’t be underestimated,” Turini said.

But whenever a cancer does present a threat to health, there are also clear advantages to catching it early. Therefore many urologists still believe that doctors and their patients should weigh these pros and cons of screening. For that reason, the authors wrote, the American Urologic Association and the American Cancer Society advocate thorough discussion and decision-making between doctors and patients.

The study authors sought to understand the state of those discussions and how the task force recommendation may have changed them. Gjelsvik noted that it’s important to measure and track the full spectrum of effects of public health actions, such as the new national recommendations.

The findings could be explained by factors independent of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation, the authors acknowledged, but they concluded the paper with this concern: “We believe our findings may be indicative of a shift in practice patterns away from detailed pre-screening discussions among health care providers who have implemented the [USPSTF] recommendation into their care giving. Long-term evaluation of this trend is necessary, particularly to ensure that men who are given an order for a PSA test receive the absolutely necessary counseling required to allow them to appreciate the important consequences associated with the decision to pursue screening.”

Amid all the findings of concern, including the overall trend and disparities of income, education, insurance and ethnicity, the researchers did find one bright spot: Black men, who are known to be at higher risk for prostate cancer incidence and death, were more likely to report having discussed advantages and disadvantages than men on average.

Turini said the study suggests that urologists may be able to do more to help their primary care physician colleagues have balanced and informative conversations with their patients. Primary care physicians are increasingly pressed for time with each patient and it can seem easy to order an additional test if blood is going to be drawn for other purposes anyway, Turini said. But the moment when a PSA test comes back with an elevated reading is not the ideal moment to only begin the conversation of what that could mean.

“It’s our job in the urology community to make it as easy as possible for the primary care physicians and other general practitioners to comfortably disseminate as complete and balanced information as possible,” he said.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Brown University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. George A Turini, Annie Gjelsvik, Joseph F Renzulli. The State of Pre-Screening Discussions About PSA Testing Following Implementation of the 2012 USPSTF Task Force Statement. Urology, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.urology.2016.12.069

Read this article on science daily: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170328132148.htm.

By | April 24th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Common Prostate Cancer Therapy May Trigger Dementia

A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) — a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease — and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Their previous studies have shown men who undergo ADT may be at an increased risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, compared to men who were not treated with the therapy.

This new analysis — the largest of its kind ever performed on this topic — shows that all existing studies taken together support the link to dementia and show a possible link to Alzheimer’s. The findings are published this week in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. “Since publishing our initial findings, there has been a lot of other research on this topic, and we wanted to see what that research was saying,” said the study’s lead author Kevin Nead, MD, MPhil, a resident in Radiation Oncology at Penn. “This analysis tells us that the composite message of existing studies is that androgen deprivation therapy is associated with dementia.”

The team compiled data from four different global databases looking at studies on ADT patients and dementia and Alzheimer’s. An analysis of more than 50,000 patients worldwide showed a consistent statistical link between men who underwent ADT for prostate cancer and men who developed dementia. Nead says the numbers show correlation, not causation at this point, but that there is evidence of a direct connection.

“Research shows androgens play a key role in neuron maintenance and growth, so the longer you undergo this therapy to decrease androgens, the more it may impact the brain’s normal functions,” Nead said.

The analysis was less conclusive on the question of Alzheimer’s. While there was still a connection, it was not as clearly defined as the link to dementia. Nead says evidence for a link between ADT and neurocognitive dysfunction is growing and should be part of the conversation between doctors and patients.

“There’s enough evidence of these links that patients should know about them when considering their options,” Nead said.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

K T Nead, S Sinha, P L Nguyen. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and dementia risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 2017; DOI: 10.1038/pcan.2017.10

Read this on Science Daily: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. “Link between common prostate cancer treatment, dementia detailed in new study: Analysis elaborates on correlation between dementia and testosterone-lowering therapy.” ScienceDaily, 30 March 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170330114954.htm.


HIFU has many proven advantages over traditional treatment modalities for prostate disease. More: www.californiahifu.com #prostatecancer #HIFU #prostate #menshealth #cancerresearch

By | April 4th, 2017|News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Prostate Cancer News: Emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment

The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report in a new study.

“Emotional distress may motivate men with low-risk prostate cancer to choose more aggressive treatment, such as choosing surgery over active surveillance,” said UB’s Heather Orom, the lead author on the study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

“It underscores what we have been pushing a long time for, which is, ‘Let’s make this decision as informed and supported as possible.’ If distress early on is influencing treatment choice, then maybe we help men by providing clearer information about prognosis and strategies for dealing with anxiety. We hope this will help improve the treatment decision making process and ultimately, the patient’s quality of life,” added Orom, PhD, associate professor of community health and health behavior in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions.

The study involved 1,531 men with newly diagnosed, clinically localized prostate cancer, meaning the disease hadn’t spread to other parts of the body.

Researchers measured participants’ emotional distress with the Distress Thermometer, an 11-point scale ranging from 0 (no distress) to 10 (extreme distress). The men were assessed after diagnosis and again as soon as they had made their treatment decision.

The majority of study participants had either low- or intermediate-risk disease, and were more likely to have been treated with surgery, followed by radiation and active surveillance.

“Men’s level of emotional distress shortly after diagnosis predicted greater likelihood of choosing surgery over active surveillance,” the researchers report. “Importantly, this was true among men with low-risk disease, for whom active surveillance may be a clinically viable option and side effects of surgery might be avoided.”

While prostate cancer is a major disease in the U.S., it is not a death sentence, according to the American Cancer Society, which estimates there are nearly 3 million prostate cancer survivors alive today.

However, overtreatment is a concern, and surgery and radiation therapy have side effects that include erectile dysfunction and incontinence, which, for the majority of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, can be avoided by instead choosing active surveillance to monitor the cancer and considering treatment if the disease progresses.

“There’s an interest in driving the decision-making experience to prevent overtreatment and ensure that men have full information about all the side effects so they can make a choice that’s preference and value driven,” Orom said. “We don’t want men to make a decision that they’ll regret later on.”

“The goal of most physicians treating men with prostate cancer is to help their patients and family members through a difficult process and help their patients receive appropriate treatment,” said Willie Underwood III, MD, MS, MPH, an associate professor in Roswell Park’s Department of Urology, and a paper co-author.

“To do so, it is helpful for physicians to better understand what is motivating men’s decisions and to address negative motivators such as emotional distress to prevent men from receiving a treatment that they don’t need or will later regret,” Underwood added.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University at Buffalo. Original written by David J. Hill. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Heather Orom, Willie Underwood, Caitlin Biddle. Emotional Distress Increases the Likelihood of Undergoing Surgery among Men with Localized Prostate Cancer. The Journal of Urology, 2017; 197 (2): 350 DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.08.007

Read this article on ScienceDaily: University at Buffalo. “For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170111103920.htm.
By | February 14th, 2017|Dr. Michael Lazar, News, Prostate Cancer|0 Comments

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU was recently selected as top urology specialist by Sonoma Magazine’s Top Doctors survey

Dr. Michael Lazar, a Santa Rosa urologist and prostate cancer expert, is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer.

lazar close upSonoma Magazine’s Top Doctor survey was submitted to Sonoma County doctors who were then asked which medical specialist they would most often recommend to a loved one, and 327 professionals emerged as top docs in 50 categories of medicine. Among physician peers Dr. Lazar rose to the top in the field of urology, supporting what the many patients who rely on Dr. Lazar’s expertise already know.

Take for example the experience of Charles Lawrence a urology patient of Dr. Lazar. When Lawrence thought he was having urinary problems he sought out Dr. Lazar for a consultation. The exam proved to be even more important to his health when Dr. Lazar discovered an unrelated lump on Lawrence’s thyroid, recommending follow-up with a surgeon who later removed the nodule.

“Dr. Lazar discovered a nodule in my thyroid because he was thorough in his evaluation. It’s as straightforward as that, and I cannot be more appreciative of his comprehensive approach to treating patients,” Lawrence said.

About Dr. Lazar

Dr. Lazar graduated from the University of Arkansas in 1978 and completed postgraduate training in surgery and urology at LSU in 1983. He is four-time board certified by the American Board of Urology and Managing Physician Director of Santa Rosa Surgical Management Co., LLC, which manages Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital’s Ambulatory Surgery Center. He also serves as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Redwood Health Services and as a member of the American Urological Association.

Dr. Lazar is part of Northern California Medical Associates and operates California HIFU in Santa Rosa. He is the medical director of HIFU Prostate Services, LLC, a leading provider of minimally-invasive prostate cancer treatments using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Dr. Lazar is also a clinical partner with HPS with the HIFU San Francisco Surgery Center of Excellence, a state-of-the-art facility that is convenient to hotels and the airport.  

HIFU: Non-invasive Treatment for Prostate Cancer

HIFU is a FDA approved precise and targeted therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, that reduces the risk of complications caused by surgery and radiation. HIFU uses ultrasound energy, or sound waves, to heat and destroy specifically targeted areas of tissue. During HIFU, the sound waves pass through healthy tissue without causing damage. At the focal point of the sound waves (like a magnifying glass focusing the rays of the sun to burn a leaf), the tissue temperature is raised to 90 degrees Celsius, destroying the targeted tissue.

Dr. Michael Lazar is the only Northern California physician and prostate cancer expert recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007.

“HIFU has produced oncological results that are broadly comparable to standard therapies and HIFU is the only noninvasive prostate cancer therapy that does not use ionizing radiation11, which can be potentially harmful,” explains Dr. Lazar.

What HIFU Patients Have to Say

lockheed-comment-and-picHIFU patients are benefiting from Dr. Lazar’s expertise and comprehensive approach as well. One such patient, Chris Lockheed of Santa Rosa, CA, came to Dr. Lazar after a biopsy revealed that he had two tumors on his prostate. Lockheed, 68, had earlier started doing research into what kind of options for treatment were available to him. When a radiation specialist in Rohnert Park told him about Dr. Lazar and the HIFU procedure, he did more homework. He found that Dr. Lazar had done hundreds of these procedures in Puerto Vallarta, and the treatment was given FDA approval last October.

“Dr. Lazar explained everything, and he’s done over 300 of the procedures, that’s why I went to him. I felt very confident. I looked at all of the choices and said ‘this is for me’.” Last spring Lockheed drove down to the San Francisco Surgery Center for the three-hour outpatient procedure. Afterwards, feeling no side effects, Lockheed got some take-out food and drove home. Chris also mentioned he needed no pain medication. The only side effect he had was the catheter, which was “a little irritating.” After getting the catheter removed Lockheed reported that, “… everything was totally normal.” A week after the procedure he was back at work, drumming on the weekend, and working in the yard.

For more information about Dr. Lazar, HIFU treatment for prostate cancer visit the HIFU website or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

By | October 18th, 2016|News, Testimonials|0 Comments

New Study: PSA levels in younger men might predict future risk of prostate cancer

mountain-bikers-in-brazil-1-1433086Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been shown to reduce death and the spread of prostate cancer to other parts of the body, but the PSA test remains highly controversial as it frequently leads to over diagnosis and over treatment of men who may not be at risk.

Smarter screening strategies that can improve the accuracy of diagnosing lethal prostate cancer are urgently needed. Through a prospective study of US men, investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have found that measuring PSA levels in younger men (between the ages of 40 and 59) could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer later in life. Their findings suggest that screening PSA levels in men at mid-life may help identify those who are at greater risk and should be monitored more closely.

“We found a single baseline PSA-level measurement during midlife could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer,” said co-lead author Mark Preston, MD, MPH, a physician in BWH’s Division of Urology. “These data identify subgroups of men, based on their PSA levels at a given age, who could benefit from screening intervals tailored to their actual magnitude of risk.”

Read the full story here …

Dr. Michael Lazar, a Santa Rosa urologist and prostate cancer expert, is the only Northern California physician recognized as a leader in the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate cancer. He has been successfully treating patients with HIFU since 2007. Dr. Lazar now offers a HIFU Program in partnership with HIFU Prostate Services, LLC (HPS). HIFU Prostate Services, LLC (HPS) is a leading provider of minimally-invasive prostate cancer treatments using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU prostate treatments are performed at San Francisco Surgery Center (SFSC). SFSC offers patients a state-of-the-art facility that is convenient to hotels and the airport. For more answers on HIFU visit this page ...  For more information about HIFU treatment or to make an appointment call: (707) 546-5553.

By | June 21st, 2016|News, Prostate Cancer, Urology|0 Comments

North Bay Business Journal article on Dr. Michael Lazar — HIFU: poised for approval by FDA

Click to view full story from North Bay Business Journal …. A nonsurgical, outpatient treatment for prostate cancer, with a low rate of side effects, is poised for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration within the next few weeks.  Treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) waves use heat focused at a specific location to destroy the area of the prostate gland affected with cancer, while any tissue outside of the focal point remains unharmed.  “The oncological results for HIFU are broadly comparable to radical surgery or radiation but the side effects are less,” said Dr. Michael Lazar, a urology specialist in Santa Rosa.  HIFU is most effective for patients with early stage prostate cancer where the cancer is localized to the prostate. The procedure preserves healthy tissue and preserving nerves, urine flow and erectile function in about 80 percent of cases compared to 40 percent–50 percent with surgery or radiation.  HIFU is also performed on an out-patient basis, taking one to four hours. A urinary catheter is inserted after the procedure and must be kept in place for one to three weeks. The most common side effects are infections in the prostate area, and incontinence, to a lesser degree than other therapies.  Click to view full story from North Bay Business Journal ….

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Get a Checkup, Have a PSA Blood Test and Learn About Symptoms of the Disease as well as Treatment Options

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death following lung cancer, and about one man in 38 will die of the disease. However, statistics show that most men diagnosed with the prostate cancer do not die from it, and more than 2.9 million men in the U.S. who were found to have this cancer are alive today. But why take a chance? A simple screening involving an annual blood test to measure PSA levels gives doctors a way to assess the presence and pace of the disease and the need for ongoing monitoring, a biopsy or direct intervention.September is national Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. About 220,800 new cases of this type of cancer are reported each year, along with 27,540 deaths attributed to the disease annually. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime. While only one man in 10,000 will typically get prostate cancer under age 40, the risk increases to six of every 10 men by age 65, according to the American Cancer Society.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death following lung cancer, and about one man in 38 will die of the disease. However, statistics show that most men diagnosed with the prostate cancer do not die from it, and more than 2.9 million men in the U.S. who were found to have this cancer are alive today. But why take a chance? A simple screening involving an annual blood test to measure PSA levels gives doctors a way to assess the presence and pace of the disease and the need for ongoing monitoring, a biopsy or direct intervention.

“Why is there such a difference between cancers? Some prostate cancer is very aggressive and progresses quickly, while other forms take many years to become life threatening,” said Michael Lazar, a noted urologist with a practice in Santa Rosa, California and a leading proponent of non-invasive High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for prostate cancer treatment.

You have a number of options if it is determined that you have this disease. These include traditional surgery to remove the prostate gland, radiation (including inserting irradiated pellets into the prostate), cryotherapy (freezing of the prostate), or non-invasive HIFU therapy using sound waves to pinpoint cancer cells and destroy them without damage to surrounding healthy tissue and minimal blood loss.

Side effects associated with invasive surgical procedures including a hospital stay, a longer recovery period plus scaring, adhesions and blood loss. There is also the risk of incontinence, erectile dysfunction (ED) and a decline of libido. Radiation can ionize otherwise healthy cells that can turn into cancer latter in life. With cryotherapy, side effects include 90% to 100% ED and urethral tissue scaring that can obstruct voiding. The HIFU procedure is virtually painless, takes only a few hours, and there are fewer side effects, thereby maintaining the quality of life. Most patients are up and around the same day.

In most instances, there are no significant symptoms during the early stages of prostate cancer, and symptoms may vary from one man to another, or can be caused by other conditions. However, there are some urinary symptoms that could signal cancer including: pain or a burning sensation while urinating as well as difficulty in starting or stopping, frequent urges to go during the night, an uncontrollable bladder, a decreased flow of the urine stream, or blood in the urine. Other symptoms include painful ejaculation or difficulty in getting an erection, swelling in the legs or pelvic area, pain or numbness in the feet, legs or hips, constant bone pain leading to fractures and blood in the semen.

“My advice to every man is to obtain a baseline PSA after age 40, then yearly exams and PSA tests after 50 years of age. For those having to make a treatment choice for prostate cancer, consider all options including HIFU. While not currently available in the U.S., HIFU is pending FDA approval and is available internationally at a full-service hospital in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, where dozens of successful HIFU procedures have been performed by me and my highly trained team,” Dr. Lazar said.

For additional information, go to the website at www.californiahifu.com, or contact Dr. Michael Lazar’s office at (707) 546-5553. His office is located at 1140 Sonoma Ave #1A, Santa Rosa, CA 95405.

Patient Testimonial: “I cannot be more appreciative of his comprehensive approach to treating patients ….” – Charles Lawrence

Click to View PDFAs a retired malpractice insurance professional, Charles Lawrence is very familiar with the many complex problems in today’s healthcare industry. He knows what to look for in a good doctor, and he deeply appreciates quality healthcare services. When Charles thought he was having urinary problems, he came to see Dr. Michael J. Lazar in Santa Rosa for an examination. Dr. Lazar didn’t find any problems with Charles’ urinary system, and Charles’ symptoms went away on their own shortly thereafter. However, Dr. Lazar discovered a lump on his thyroid that other physicians had failed to find previously …

Lazar testimonial 8.18 lower half

 

By | August 18th, 2015|Dr. Michael Lazar, Testimonials|0 Comments