santa rosa urology

New blood test better at predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

A new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures -- distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease. By identifying molecular changes in the PSA protein, the findings of this study suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may reduce the need for biopsy, and may lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer. A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures -- distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease. By [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:20+00:00 May 16th, 2017|

Doctors believe it’s important to discuss pros and cons of prostate cancer screening with patients

A new study finds that while a blood test that helps to screen for prostate cancer remains common, only 30 percent of men in a large national survey reported having a balanced discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the screening with their doctor. Moreover, having such a discussion of both pros and cons has become less likely since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation against performing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in 2012. "That only about a third of patients reported having a discussion of advantages and disadvantages is an alarming statistic," said study lead author Dr. George Turini III, clinical instructor in medical science at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a urologist with the Southcoast Physician Group. [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:20+00:00 April 24th, 2017|

Common Prostate Cancer Therapy May Trigger Dementia

A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) -- a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease -- and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Their previous studies have shown men who undergo ADT may be at an increased risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, compared to men who were not treated with the therapy. This new analysis -- the largest of its kind ever performed on this topic -- shows that all existing studies taken together support the link to dementia and show a possible link to Alzheimer's. The findings are published this week in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. "Since [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:20+00:00 April 4th, 2017|

Study Reveals Quality of Life Concerns Paramount in Prostate Cancer Treatment Options

For many men newly diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer, concerns about potential quality-of-life issues often guide treatment decisions. A new study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identifies distinct patterns of side effects that patients could use to guide their choices. In the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study examines quality-of-life outcomes for the treatment choices most patients will face. Those choices include active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation treatment, and brachytherapy, a treatment that involves inserting radioactive seeds into the prostate. "Patients diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer -- and that's the vast majority of patients with this disease -- face many treatment options that are thought to be similarly efficacious," said Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH, UNC Lineberger member [...]

2017-12-13T13:37:20+00:00 March 27th, 2017|

Prostate Cancer Rates Take a Nose Dive Per Latest Statistics

Dr. Michael Lazar of California HIFU, Urologist and Prostate Cancer expert reflects on the latest American Cancer Society statics The results from the American Cancer Society’s newest report on cancer rates is good news for everyone and particularly good news for prostate cancer patients: incidents of cancer is down as is the likelihood of prostate cancer patients dying from the diagnosis. According to the report the cancer death rate has dropped from its peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 161.2 in 2014 (per 100K population), the most recent year for which data was available to analyze. Overall the decline in cancer is linked with decreases in smoking and advances in early detection and treatment. The four major cancer drops are: lung (- 43% between 1990 [...]

2017-06-07T08:43:49+00:00 January 23rd, 2017|